Haviah Mighty, Beth Million, Kamilah

Haviah Mighty didn’t need to change her birth name when she decided to dedicate her career to music. In fact, Mighty couldn’t be more accurate a word to describe the 26-year-old artist, named one of XXL’s 15 Toronto Rappers You Should Know in 2019.
Raised in a musical household in Brampton, Ontario, Mighty started singing at the age of 4, rapping at 11, and producing at 15.
Well-known for being one of the three MCs who make up The Sorority — a hip-hop group born during an all-female cypher on International Women’s Day in 2016 — Mighty is making equally large waves as a solo artist.
Haviah has been releasing music independently since 2009, but it was her project, Flower City (2017), that propelled her solo career into further success. In 2018, Mighty’s track “Vámonos” appeared on HBO’s hit series, Insecure. That same year, Mighty was declared winner of the prestigious 2018/2019 Allan Slaight JUNO Master Class.
Haviah’s explosive live show, filled with in-your-face intensity and her fast, technical flows, has also quickly developed her reputation as one to keep an eye on, earning her opening slots for acclaimed artists like Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg, Rick Ross, Redman and Method Man, Sheck Wes, Nelly, Desiigner, and Kranium.
To date, Mighty recently released Polaris Prize-winning album, ‘13th Floor’, her most fully- realized project to date. Garnering overwhelming praise from the likes of Pitchfork, Hot New Hip Hop, and Lyrical Lemonade to name a few, Haviah continues to carve out spaces that boldly defy gendered expectations for women in hip hop.

Beth Million

Beth Million creates power anthems for those ready to listen. Based in New York City by way of Geneva, the R&B artist debuted through the release of her single “Dirty Little Secret.” Since, Beth Million has released the track’s accompanying music video and a follow-up single, “Twice.” She has resultantly built a devoted and engaged following, primarily based in New York City and London.



Drawing inspiration from the likes of H.E.R., Anderson .Paak, and Ms. Lauryn Hill, Beth Million’s soulful vocals yet rhythmic beats offer a place of empowerment through reflection and vulnerability. Her live sets are most notable by their living contrast between a youthful, contagious energy and a soulful depth.



Beth Million is currently at work on recording music scheduled for release throughout 2020, including a debut EP.


Drawing inspiration from the likes of H.E.R., Anderson .Paak, and Ms. Lauryn Hill, Beth Million’s soulful vocals yet rhythmic beats offer a place of empowerment through reflection and vulnerability. Her live sets are most notable by their living contrast between a youthful, contagious energy and a soulful depth.



Beth Million is currently at work on recording music scheduled for release throughout 2020, including a debut EP.

Saturday mornings growing up in the Bahamas meant chores and a house filled with an eclectic range of
music for Kamilah (Gibson); anyone from Kathleen Battle to Bob Dylan to Jimmy Cliff (she’s been busting
out the high notes in Minnie Ripperton’s “Loving You” ever since). Today, Kamilah is posed to set a
standard for musicians everywhere with her unbridled magnetism and commitment to making intentional,
meaningful music.
Kamilah might say she didn’t quite see a music career for herself as a possibility until after she placed at
the Amateur Night competition at the renowned Apollo Theater in Harlem, New York, but her roots give
light to a well-rounded life growing up in The Bahamas. Her childhood was full of memories climbing
mango trees and listening to some of the greatest musicians of our time with her mother and step-father
and learning the jazz ropes with her dad. Music was the constant that kept her grounded and helped to
teach her about life, and that truth is at the core of why she wants to continue to create it, both for herself
and others. Admits Kamilah, “Music, to me, is the most powerful force we have. It can move a body
without that body being consciously aware of its own movement. Knowing that, I think it’s important to be
mindful as a creator of music; to remain aware that the energy you put out has the power to shift a
perspective, to heal and help people through even the most traumatizing moments. It has always been
that kind of force for me and I want to share that with as many people as possible.”
In keeping with her commitment to creating intentional work, “Beautiful Boy,” her latest single (released
4.13.19), is a reflection on masculinity; it challenges the idea that vulnerability and softness are inherently
anti-masculine, suggesting instead that if we all strive toward emotional intelligence and balance, we can
invite light into desolate spaces within and around us. Kamilah says she “hopes that the song resonates
with the people who need it most and that it helps them feel safer to explore their vulnerabilities.”
Her upcoming debut EP Learning Curve is a true blend of genres, offering up jazzy lines (“The Love You
Need”, “HeartFeels”, “Dark Skin | Coconut Oil”) amidst tunes with obvious R&B roots (“Careless Thieves”,
“Losing My Pride”, “Beautiful Boy”, and soulful pop (“Letters”, “Dangerous”). But what is perhaps the most
beautiful aspect of her new release is that the Learning Curve she refers to is one she has experienced in
many aspects of her life. Through her growth over the years, she has written and produced songs that
entertain struggles with existentialism, racism, sexism, culture, love and many more hard topics. And
instead of burying those difficult lessons deep, she has brought them to light in a way that we can relate
to. “I want to make music that doesn’t deflate you,” Kamilah explains. “Like Erykah Badu or Sade. They
address important things but don’t leave you out on a ledge. There is always something to gain- some
hopeful message or something to learn about people and ourselves- that offers a way out of challenging
moments. That’s important for me.”

The last track of Learning Curve, a beautiful and introspective track titled “Dark Skin | Coconut Oil”, is also
a great reflection of her strength as a writer. And because she is a total empath, Kamilah truly feels the
emotions of the songs she creates as she sings them, making this one of the most fulfilling - and perhaps
difficult - songs to write and perform live. But with the catalog of music she has yet to release this year –
before and after Learning Curve is introduced to the world - and the widespread relatability evidenced in
the words of her debut single “So Long” (ft. Sho), there is so much more beauty to behold. And if anyone
can continue to champion tough, thought-provoking topics (i.e. gender stereotypes and colorism) through
a honeyed soundscape, Kamilah is definitely the one. As someone who has admitted that her ideal
superpower would be to physically be in two places at once so that she could create more and be as

reliable as possible for more people, Kamilah might be on one of the most selfless adventures we’ve
witnessed. We fully expect that inspiring drive and growing musical prowess to continue to cause heads
to turn.

$10 - $12

Tickets

Upcoming Events
Mercury Lounge