Red Molly, Birds Of Chicago, Teddy Thompson

Red Molly combines the forces of three songwriters with unique character and style, creating a show that is larger than the sum of its parts. Known for their 3-part harmony, their songs and arrangements lay bare a love of vocal blend. The band weaves together threads of American music—from country & blues to folk & bluegrass. Their innovative instrumentation is suited for roots-rock and heartful ballads alike, and the alchemy of their personalities onstage draws even back row listeners into a sense of intimacy. Red Molly is simply a joy to experience.

Singing spine-tingling high notes, Abbie Gardner is a dobro player and improviser from a musical family. A consummate performer, her songs and performance have the punch of rhythm and blues. Playing guitar and tambourine, Laurie MacAllister draws inspiration from classic folk and singer-songwriters. Her voice stretches octaves, warm and romantic one moment, playful and subversive the next. Molly Venter has a smoky voice that is unforgettable, and a moody approach to song-smithing. Quirky and fashion-forward, she moves in step to the music while playing guitar and tambourine.

Forming in 2004, Red Molly has inspired countless female trios and has since reinvented themselves as a high-octane five-piece band in 2017. They remain a dominant force on the Americana/Folk scene due in part to their laughter and spontaneity onstage. Upright bassist Craig Akin and percussionist and electric guitarist Eben Pariser fill out the sound, giving the show a broad range of musical options—from complex and hard-hitting to sparse and delicate.

Birds Of Chicago

“Nero and Russell play folk-rock with impressionistic flourishes and gospel warmth, lent unexpected extravagance by Russell’s singing…” —NPR
Following their incendiary set at Third Man Records, NPR Music named Birds of Chicago one of the Best of Americanafest 2018. The band continues to ride a swell of good mojo that they’ve enjoyed in the Americana world since their inception, with live shows that alternate between moments of hushed attention and wild, rock and soul abandon.
Birds of Chicago have been riding a swell of good mojo in the American world since their inception in late 2012. With their new album, Love in Wartime, they are set to both confirm that roots world buzz, and break on through to a wider audience across the world.

Recorded in Chicago against a backdrop of bewilderment, deep-divide and dread, Love in Wartime is a rock and roll suite with a cinematic sweep. Co-produced by Nero and Luther Dickinson (North Mississippi Allstars), it evokes epic efforts of the 60’s and 70’s, with love as the undeniable throughline. As Russell puts it, “Any act of love is an act of bravery. These songs are snapshots of covenants, big and small, of trust and understanding. We want to give people some good news, and we want them to be able to dance when they hear it.”

When BOC released it’s last album, the Joe Henry produced Real Midnight, in 2016, critics scrambled to find the right terminology to describe the deep lyricism, gut-punch singing and fevered musicality. . . “Secular gospel” Was one phrase that caught some traction. That fervor is evident in Love in Wartime as well: “Roll Away the heavy stone/roll away the heavy hours/roll on in the summer mon/who’s alive who’s alive who’s alive?” The invitation is joyous, but urgant. . . call it “secular gospel,” or call it what they used to call poetry intoned over roots music mash-ups: rock n roll. The Birds consider themselves a rock and roll band first and foremost, and Love in Wartime doesn’t leave any doubt about that.

Built around the chemistry and fire between Allison Russell and JT Nero, the band has included a core band of empathetic assassins since it took to the road full time in 2013. Russell and Nero played with different bands in the mid-aughts (Po’ Girl and JT and the Clouds) before finding their way to each other. Nero found himself a transcendent vocal muse in Russell (a powerful writer in her own right) and the band honed its chops on the road, playing 200 shows a year between 2013-17. All that shaping and sharpening, oer so many miles, led them back to Chicago’s Electrical Audio in January of 2017, to begin recording. The first day in studio was inauguration day, and they didn’t need any more motivation than that to do what they came to do.

The Birds attract a mix of indy rockers, NPRists, jam-kids and folkies to their gigs, which alternate between moments of hushed attention and wild, rock and soul abandon. Says JT Nero, chief songwriter for the band, “A good show can send you back out into the night feeling–for at least a little while–that everything isn’t broken. . .Right now, we wanna dose out as much of that feeling as we can.”

Called "one of the most gifted singer-songwriters of his generation," by The New York Times, singer-songwriter Teddy Thompson is a native Englishman who has adopted New York City as his home; famously the son of singer-songwriters Richard and Linda Thompson, he emigrated to the States almost twenty years ago, barely out of his teens, to embark on a career of his own.

He was heavily influenced not by folk music but by such artists as Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, and the Everly Brothers. As NPR reported, "He has said he didn't listen to any music made after 1959 until he was 16. As a kid, he listened to early rock 'n' roll and country music exclusively." This resulted in a unique voice that is at once rock and country, then pop and folk.


While music is in his DNA, Thompson sings with his own voice, a powerfully understated, emotional, echoey croon. (The Guardian)



Since arriving in the United States, he has released five albums to critical acclaim and has contributed to many works, including his solo "I Don't Want to Say Goodbye" and duet "King of the Road," with Rufus Wainwright, from the soundtrack to the Golden Globe- and Bafta-winning film Brokeback Mountain. He has also collaborated on projects with Rufus and Martha Wainwright, Jenni Muldaur, and others. Thompson recorded two solo songs for the soundtrack to the Leonard Cohen tribute I'm Your Man: "Tonight Will be Fine" and "The Future." He also contributed two songs to the album The Songs of Nick Drake: Way to Blue, a retrospective on the late singer.

In 2015, Teddy and his family released the album Family, a collaborative project in which each member of the extended family wrote and recorded two songs--from wherever they live. This meant that recording took place from Los Angeles to London, then the final product was produced by Teddy in New York. It was released in early 2015 under the name Thompson.



Thompson is based out of New York City, where in his free time, he performs with his rockabilly cover band, Poundcake.



Teddy Thompson has just completed his sixth solo album, for release later in 2019

$20 - $25

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