Drunken Prayer, China, Taylor Kingman

Drunken Prayer

Morgan Geer, the songwriter behind Drunken Prayer, is also the guitar player for iconic alt-country goths, Freakwater. Recently Morgan has been touring internationally with The Handsome Family.

Geer was born in San Francisco and grew up traveling around the US, following his folk-singing mother. Today he splits time between Portland, OR and Asheville, NC. He’s lived in nearly every region of the country and he sounds like it. His is American music – straight, no irony chaser.

Drunken Prayer will likely bring to mind The Band for a lot of listeners, with the sense of place and history. But Morgan Geer’s songs and his singing often suggest a kinship with artists like Bobby Charles or Doug Sahm, musicians with Southern roots, with a yip and break to their voices, and notes of sadness offset by a wicked sense of humor.

Over the past two years Drunken Prayer has played hundreds of shows across 18 countries and across the US at venues such as the Pickathon Music Festival and San Francisco’s Great American Music Hall. Geer’s music has been featured on AMC, NPR, WFMU and SiriusXM.

The new Drunken Prayer album, Cordelia Elsewhere, was mixed by Mitch Easter (Let’s Active, REM) at The Fidelitorium in rural North Carolina. An eccentric descendent of outlaw country, the songs bare witness to life on earth in uncertain times.

China

The newly formed China is an Americana outfit featuring a talented group of Bay Area veterans: Jeff Moller, Michael James Tapscott, Raphi Gottesman, and Dominic East have joined forces to make a stellar debut 5-song EP, The Wall.

Moller, Tapscott, and Gottesman are members of Odawas and Dominic East has performed with Rogue Wave, but they all have produced fine music on a variety of projects on their own. Tappscott and Gottesman have each released solo albums, while East fronts A Carnival of Hours. While some of the members’ music can be bit more experimental, China plays straightforward country rock that could easily pass for tracks on Neil Young’s Harvest Moon if you swapped Tappscott and Moller’s vocals with Young’s. Lesser musicians couldn’t pull it off, but the guys in China are all extremely talented and obviously know how to make a record. China is only sharing the digital EP for now, but Tappscott tells me there’s another EP written and plans for shows in the works. Check out The Wall below.

Taylor Kingman

Taylor Kingman makes music that resets the clocks. You know the feeling of standing beneath a trestle on a hard day, a can of cheap beer, flicking a lighter and dreaming up wild ideas until a heavy train comes thundering overhead and you scream and scream until your voice gives out and you feel lighter? That’s the thing that lives deep in Taylor’s songs. There’s something so rubbed-raw honest and drunken-truth about them. You can’t help but be transfixed and transformed.



Born in Portland, OR and raised in Marion County, Taylor picked up a guitar and started writing at 12. In high school, he formed The Hill Dogs, a raucous, powerful band that hit hard beneath his explosive lyrics. After graduating, he wrote like a madman, played out heavily with the band, and taught guitar on the side.

In 2015, Taylor packed up and headed to Portland where he played anywhere and everywhere with The Hill Dogs until he blew out his voice and had to halt the band. The restrictions of his healing vocal chords gave way to a deluge of new writing. Taylor joined multiple projects around the city with some of Portland’s finest and recorded his debut solo album Wannabe at the great Mike Coykendall’s studio, due out November 17th on Mama Bird Recording Co. He recently formed ‘TK and the Holy Know Nothings’ with Lewi Longmire, Jay Cobb Anderson, Tyler Thompson, and Josh Simon as a vehicle for a growing ocean of new material.

Of writing songs, Taylor says, “Each word is a world waiting to swallow me whole. I get drunk off the pitter patter poetry of lines that root me to the cold, unforgiving ground, all at once, drowning me in the violent beautiful futility of humanity, yet, also, set fire to my eyes, sending me swirling and whirling, floating blind and thoughtless through the maze of the mind. I want the words to explode bloody in all their truth, for better or worse. Vivid images dripping with feeling bursting like lightbulbs in the back of the head.” Enough said. Train thundering. Sparks raining down.

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