Chaos and Carnage Tour 2019

Having spent several years lauded as one of the frontrunners in their genre, in 2012 Whitechapel stand as a defining force in contemporary heavy music. Building dramatically on the trademarked bludgeon of their first three releases, with Whitechapel the Tennessean sextet have inarguably delivered their most intense, dynamic, and downright hostile record to date. Drenched in atmospheric darkness, the record is also rife with gripping melodies that drag the listener in to the tumult, willing or otherwise, and across its ten tracks it is infused with an emotional depth that pointedly separates the band from the plethora of two-dimensional mosh-starters that have sprung up in their wake. "These songs are some of the best material we have released to date, and the whole vibe of the record compelled us to self-title it," states guitarist Alex Wade. "With every record we strive for something different – we're always going to stay true to what Whitechapel is, but we want to evolve and do something that is fresh and engaging both for ourselves and for the people who support us."

Setting the scene with the brooding piano that prefaces the storm of frantic riffs and pulverizing drums of opener "Make It Bleed", it is clear that Whitechapel are coming from a place of pure darkness this time out. At times teetering on the brink of despair while always primed to fight anything and everything that gets in their way, every track has its own personality, fitting perfectly alongside each other to form a breathtaking whole. From the heads down attack of "Section 8" or the merciless "(Cult)uralist" to the apocalyptic drama of "Dead Silence" or the loping grooves of "Possibilities Of An Impossible Existence" the band put it all on the line, creating something that is as honest as it is devastating. "There's a lot of variety on this record – it has the fastest songs we've ever written on it, but it also has the slowest songs we've ever written, so whether you like the slower grooves of A New Era Of Corruption (2010) or the really fast riffs of This Is Exile (2008) there is something for everyone on this album," explains Wade. "It also has a much stronger sense of dynamics, because if you're just smashing someone over the head one hundred percent of the time it can get monotonous, and there's more melody to it too. Some of the choruses are really dark but have so much melody you could almost sing over them – which is something we would never do, but having that dynamic there is exciting to us." Having grown displeased over time with A New Era Of Corruption, primarily due to the fact it was comprised of songs written by individual members rather than as a shared effort, the band rectified this with Whitechapel, and Wade believes this collaboration plays a large part in what sets the record apart from its predecessor. "In the credits of the last record it was like this guy wrote this song, and then this guy wrote that song, whereas there's so much collaboration on this record it wasn't worth going through it to try and list it in the credits, it is the product of our efforts. I think that's cool, and it's good to know that when we work together we're at our finest."

A further contributing factor to the record's power is the addition of drummer Ben Harclerode (ex-Knights Of The Abyss), who joins Wade and guitarists Ben Savage and Zach Householder, bassist Gabe Crisp, and vocalist Phil Bozeman. "Most drummers that we had seen play our songs would kinda have to dumb it down rather than play it exactly the way it was on the record, but Ben sent us a video of him playing "Reprogrammed To Hate" and every single note, every little cymbal accent was there, so we were extremely blown away by how he had replicated what Kevin Lane had played on previous albums," Wade states. "He sent us another video playing the much faster "Father Of Lies" and after that we knew we had to get him down to jam with us. He learned an eleven-song setlist, turned up, sat down behind the kit, and we ran through the whole set without stopping, it was like he had been in the band for years. The power and precision he brings to Whitechapel is just amazing, and having him in with us writing the new record definitely took that side of things to the next level."

While frontman Phil Bozeman has proven himself one of the most formidable vocalists and lyricists in metal of the last few years, his previous efforts pale in comparison to his contributions to Whitechapel. "While it's definitely brutal I would say that first and foremost it's a dark and depressing record," he states. "I didn't go for one big concept that unites all the songs this time out, I just wrote about whatever I was feeling. I like that it's kind of scattered and covers a lot of topics, and I think that's an important part of the record's power." Whether ruminating on his general disillusionment with humanity ("Faces"), decrying the sheep-like nature of society as people allow themselves to be led rather than standing up as leaders themselves ("(Cult)uralist"), or giving in to the belief that there is no hope for the future ("Possibilities Of An Impossible Existence"), Bozeman never pulls a punch, and his vocal performance is equally unflinching. "I didn't want to just have the same monotone kind of screaming, I wanted to branch out and really get the emotion behind it across. This was about getting so angry you just had to let it all out. You're not even worrying about how good it sounds, you're just yelling out of pure spite and rage, and I think that really comes across. I didn't want anyone listening to it thinking it's just the same old bullshit. We're better than that."

Working with producer Mark Lewis (Deicide, Devildriver), according to Wade it was not until they were in the studio and the songs started coming together that the band realized just how good a record they were making. "Honestly, everyone at the beginning of this record was kind of iffy about it," he laughs wryly. "As we were putting the demos together we were like yeah, this stuff's pretty cool but we were a little worried about it. But then when we got in there with Mark, every time we added a layer it just got better and better." Blown away by Harclerode's razor sharp performance and the huge drum sound engineered by Lewis, a killer guitar tone infusing the wealth of punishing riffs with life, and a monstrous bass sound kicking things in the ass, at every turn the band's enthusiasm grew. "It was all just coming together amazingly, and as soon as Phil did his vocals it was like oh my God! This is our favorite record!"

Returning to their rightful place on the road, the band are enthused to take these new songs to their rabid fan base. They stand confident in their belief that their followers will hungrily devour the latest evolution of their sound, and having dramatically bolstered their fan base through blowing away the unsuspecting crowds on 2010's Warped Tour they are sure to draw in new adherents anywhere they play. While Wade firmly believes that the band are still growing and striving to improve, for now he could not be happier with the fruits of their labor. "Every band at some point plateaus, it's inevitable, but we're not there yet, we're still growing, and I think this record proves that. Looking at the finished thing – the music, the vocals, the overall vibe behind it, all the way down to the mix and the master – it's almost like a perfect storm where everything came together just right and resulted in the record that we needed to put out."

Since John Gallagher and Jason Netherton first formed the band during 'the popular days of Death Metal' in 1991, Dying Fetus have progressed, gained it's unique style and become one of the most acclaimed and popular Death Metal/Grindcore acts in the metal underground.

The band's members combine technical brutality with catchy song structures which make each single track they have released so far innovative and memorable.

After touring with bands such as The Berzerker, Hate Eternal, Gorguts, Skinless and other modern Death Metal acts and releasing five full-lenghts; Jason left the band while Sparky Voyles and Kevin Talley were asked to leave because of various internal conflicts.

Everyone was obviously expecting Dying Fetus' imminent death, but it never happened.

In 2003, Dying Fetus re-appeared with a new album, "Stop At Nothing", and a completely new line-up (only John Gallagher remained). Incredibly enough, even though basically a totally different band, all of the elements that made Dying Fetus such a great group were present in the new release and for someone that didn't know the facts, it would seem that nothing ever changed in the line-up.

Revocation was formed in 2006 by childhood friends Dave Davidson (guitar/vocals), Anthony Buda (bass/vocals), and Phil Dubois-Coyne (drums). The Boston-based trio quickly started gigging throughout New England, and recorded their first demo, the three-track ‘Summon the Spawn’, by years end.

No sooner was ‘Empire…’ released than Relapse Records was calling, and the band was signed in early 2009. By spring the band was studio-ready once again, and entered Damage with Rutcho to record ‘Existence is Futile’, their Relapse debut.

2010 saw Revocation add touring guitarist Dan Gargiuolo, and the newly-expanded band hit the international tour trail hard. Revocation logged miles in Japan supporting Behemoth, Europe supporting Dying Fetus, and the US and Canada playing alongside the likes of the The Black Dahlia Murder, Whitechapel, Misery Index, Veil of Maya, and many more. All in all, the band covered 13 countries with over 150 shows.

Their latest full length, 'Chaos of Forms' was released in 2011.

Formed in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2007, FALLUJAH has since displayed a rugged work ethic, investing countless months and weeks on the road in North America and internationally. The band's commitment to crafting forward thinking music has helped them build their own diehard fanbase from the ground-up through several releases, including 2009's Leper Colony EP, 2011's The Harvest Wombs debut LP, and their 2013 -Nomadic- EP. Now, with their newest work, The Flesh Prevails, FALLUJAH has ultimately paved the way for a new melodic and atmospheric perspective on death metal.

Explanation of the Name: Fallujah is a city in the Al Anbar province of Iraq that at the time of the bands formation sustained the highest concentration of destruction and casualties on both sides of the fighting. The members of Fallujah have lived the majority of their lives in the post 9/11 world growing up with the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan as well as observing the tension between East and West and religious turmoil. The city of Fallujah represents the pinnacle of tensions, hostility and destruction that has come to define the world we live in. To claim that the band has no knowledge of what went on there or is disrespectful is simply an uninformed opinion and irrelevant to the true message of the band.

​Uncured is a progressive metal band based in NYC that is attracting international attention for its combination of technical musicianship, brutal riffs, and beautiful melodic interludes.

​Uncured released its first full-length record Medusa on March 10, 2017. Metalsucks.net wrote that Medusa is "a synthesis of all manner of melodic, progressive, technical metal — Dream Theater, Opeth, et al. — mixed with a groovy, almost tribal approach trafficked by ’90s stalwarts like Sepultura and Fear Factory. Have those two genres ever been mixed together before? Probably, somewhere. Have they ever been mixed together before with such finesse and originality? Certainly not."
Metal Injection reported that "Uncured sounds a bit like old school Dream Theater with some modern tricks thrown in, such as full-on breakdowns and smoking guitar acrobatics. This is band comprised of extremely talented and promising young musicians."

​Uncured recently concluded a 6-week tour of North America with Swedish metal giants Katatonia. Uncured is quickly gaining a reputation among fans and critics for its aggressive, technical, yet highly diverse live performances.

​Metal Assault Magazine reported that "the talent in musical composition and song arrangement was vastly evident right from the outset, and it never ceased to engage and compel. Uncured’s roots are firmly planted in prog, but also in Scandinavian death metal, and the manner in which they moved from crushing heavy grooves to break into smooth, sexy interludes was beyond exemplary and forced the onlookers to smile in admiration." Shutter 16 Magazine simply stated: "just wow, the raw talent of such a young fronted band is outstanding. Formed, written, and lead by two teenagers, is truly insane." The magazine continued that Uncured has "the sound of old school metal with an influx of modern solos and rhythms, while vocally pulling from a death metal side of things. The solos were the contrast to their music, very progressive sounding and very technical, whereas their song structure was brutal and heavy."

Critics have commented on the diversity of Uncured's sound. CrypticRock.com reports that Uncured "matches speedy, technical guitar riffs with blistering drumming--but the true highlight of Uncured's live set is the ability to slow it down at the drop of a dime, mixing in darker, compelling storylines amidst all the chaos." Metal Nexus reviewed Uncured's show in Washington, DC: "It has been a long time since I have been this utterly impressed by a new band with only a debut album. And how often do you see two vocalists unleashing harsh vocals with intense yet melodic riffs? The young lads with their youthful energy, technical prowess, and blistering speed set the stage on fire."

Uncured was founded in 2015 by brothers Rex Cox and Zak Cox. Zak and Rex both play guitar and sing, and together wrote all of the material on Medusa. Joining Uncured on drums is Liam Manley from Portland, Oregon. Liam has over 13 years experience playing drums, including five years of professional session work with various artists across the U.S. Jon Kita from Boston, Massachusetts, who also plays with metal stalwarts Diecast and City of Homes, rounds out the Uncured line-up on bass.

Uncured released Spontaneous Generation in 2016, a 4-song instrumental EP. Max Portnoy of the band Next to None (and son of Dream Theater drumming legend Mike Portnoy) played drums on the EP.

$10.00 - $500.00

Tickets

LIMITED $10 PRE SALE 1/18-1/20 from 10AM-10PM (or until sold out)!

$25 Advance/ $28 Day of Show/ $40 Premier Red Room/ $43.75 RSVD Seat @ a Community Table/ $175 Full Table/ $500 Premier Cabanas

Who’s Going

Upcoming Events
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