Trevor McSpadden

With a voice like a freight train soundtracked by the warmest twang, Trevor McSpadden returns to Barmel backed by a full band. Accompanied by Steve Mugalian (Chicago, IL) on drums, Philip McArdle (Athens, GA) on electric guitar, and Tom Ward (San Diego, CA) on bass, the honky tonker promotes dancing, romance and a western spirit. This year, McSpadden released two albums—a collection of crooners titled Let's Fall Together, followed by a live recorded set at San Diego's Grand Ole BBQ. The former lead singer of the Hoyle Brother proves that if 2017's records are a testament to his live shows, attendees will experience plenty of country swinging, contented ears and fluttering hearts.

- Victoria Stoker, Monterey County Weekly, October 2017

Amarillo native Trevor McSpadden moved to Chicago in 2005 expecting his love for old-school honky-tonk to go undernourished, but within a few years he found kindred souls and landed a gig that would launch his career. Between 2008 and 2013 McSpadden served as lead singer for local country institution the Hoyle Brothers, pushing a solid band toward greatness (the combo managed to survive his loss, though his departure has certainly stung). Following a brief stint in Nashville, McSpadden packed his bags for San Diego and just recently dropped his second solo album, The Only Way (Chaparral Street Music). A blast of soulful twang, with frequent Tex-Mex flavors, the record was produced by Pete Anderson, the guy who guided Dwight Yoakam’s sound for many years. It shows again that McSpadden has no interest in reinventing honky-tonk, instead preferring to find new wrinkles deep within the genre—here a crisp rhythm attack in combination with the woozy pedal steel and flanged rhythm guitar of the 70s surrounds his unfussy singing. Most of his songs deal with familiar strains of heartbreak, infidelity, and romantic longing: “His Wedding Ring Is Gone” employs a Hangover-like conceit, with the subject regretfully waking up to realize he’s hawked his wedding ring for a night of drunken sex, while “Write a Song for You” cleverly finds the narrator wagging his finger at an ex, betraying his indifference while singing, “I’ve wasted enough time / Why would I waste a rhyme?”
- Peter Margasak, Chicago Reader,

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