With their sophomore release Unbuilding, the Pauses have hit their sonic geyser, and attentive listeners can marvel at the resulting indierocktronica glints and glitter. Based in Orlando, Florida, the Pauses are multi-instrumentalist Jason Kupfer, vocalist-bassist-keyboardist Tierney Tough, and drummer Nathan Chase. Their debut, A Cautionary Tale, introduced listeners to Kupfer’s studied ear and methodical rock flourishes, Chase’s technical rhythms, and Tough’s attentive musicality and immaculate vocal. Both of their albums were produced and mixed by J. Robbins (Jawbox, Burning Airlines), and his influence can be heard in the heavier guitar propulsion that churns under the allure of the electronic ear candy on the surface. This combination live makes dancing feel like a decision the whole room made at once.
On Unbuilding, the Pauses have evolved their collaborative songwriting, and few tracks show the pop heft of that effort as well as “Digital Detox.” It slams you almost like a wall of sound, with Tough’s typically clear-as-a-bell vocal distorted to great effect, evoking ‘60s girl groups with warped sensibilities. Trumpets, timpani, cello, theremin and electronic elements are called upon to create the Pauses’ authentic sound, and then whisked away to allow the vocals space, as in the sparse, unusual dreamscape on “Had/Have.” Other times, the sound can bound in bilateral increments, like the playful piano to guitar crush of “The Means.” Their range is key, with loud live rockers like “Don’t Wake Me Up” and “Animus?”, which is particularly intense as it dangles wildly at the album’s end and concludes, “What a way to feel nothing real.”
That line evokes an overarching theme of the album, which gazes into the black mirror and is smart enough not to take it seriously. Songs like “Eventually, Everything Connects,” “Digital Detox” and “Don’t Wake Me Up” suggest a rebellion against the online drone, with lines that invite you to throw your arms up and sing out, “I don’t need the details shoved down my throat.

The Sh-Booms

There's this dynamic that churns hard in The Blurred Odyssey, the debut full-length album by ascendant Orlando garage-soul enterprise The Sh-Booms, out March 22, 2019 on Limited Fanfare Records. The music pumps with the hot, red blood of life irrepressible. But there's a cloud on the horizon, the doomed sense of life's finitude, that fueled these songs. Rather than dead-end nihilism, though, it's resulted in the kind of urgent, creative friction that Hunter S. Thompson could get down with. In making this album, The Sh-Booms have dug through the blur of life, swam through a sea of booze, to find love and truth in the shadow of the void.Although a soul band through and through, the grease and bite they've been picking up in the years leading up to this big step out have been forged in the bad company of punk and garage bands. From that underground now rises a new hurricane of big orchestration, maximum stomp and fresh intent. It's a little ache and a lot of party all wrapped up in a wrecking ball.Since their 2011 inception, The Sh-Booms have become kind of a thing in their native scene and beyond. Besides perennial winners of “Best Soul Act” in the Orlando Weekly's big annual Best of Orlando issue, they've been tapped to share the stage with national names like The Roots, Of Montreal, Talib Kweli, KRS-One, Jacuzzi Boys, Budos Band, Big Freedia, Lee Fields, St. Paul & the Broken Bones and The B-52's (whom the band toured with in 2017 and 2018). They've been featured on NPR, their music has been made it on TV (CW's Supergirl) and they've played Austin City Limits, Okeechobee Music Festival, SunFest and Gasparilla Music Festivals.Since powerhouse singer Brenda Radney joined in 2015, the band's course has been locked, their date with destiny set. She was signed to Justin Timberlake's Tennman label, even appearing on his album, The 20/20 Experience, Pt. 2. But after clicking with band leader Al Ruiz while recording separately in the same studio, she jumped aboard The Sh-Booms to turn this train into a true locomotive. After the release of their 2016 Usage Fee EP and a countless number of shows in the Southeast, the 10 songs along The Blurred Odyssey were Produced by Grammy-nominated Alan Armitage (AA Villain) over an 18-month span that cemented the band as a tight-knit unit. That chemistry achieved is where The Sh-Booms are now, and The Blurred Odyssey is their testament. The seas are stirrin'......The storm's a-brewin'

Tele & The Ghost Of Our Lord

Solo alias for multi-instrumentalist/producer and visual-artist Matthew Kamm, aka Tele V. Cheeseburger, TELETHON, etc.

$10.00 - $12.00

Tickets Available at the Door

You booted up your 32mb Rio mp3 player and confided in your Furby that you'd be Rockafeller Skanking down to Spencer's Gifts with 3D Doritos in hand to check out the new batch of age-inappropriate birthday cards. It was 1998 and you weren't gonna let cringing your way through the animal cracker scene in Armageddon with your parents get you down. Well now you can finally settle the great Antz vs. A Bug's Life debate as Will's Pub is transported back in time to......1998! The Pauses will be taking you back 20 years with Music, Movies, Games, Costumes, Foods, Beepers, F-R-I-E-N-D-S, a Big Lebowski photobooth, raffles, trivia, themed drinks, and a few other surprises.

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