The Dead South

A Canadian folk-bluegrass musical ensemble from Regina, Saskatchewan. They sing about murderous, estranged spouses and runaway lover cousins in a boot-stomping acoustic configuration that includes banjo, mandolin, cello and guitar, some whistles, hoots and hollerin’, and finger snappin’. The idea for a rockin’ stompin’ bluegrass band came to Nate and Danny 2012; they had played together before back in high school in a short-lived alternative grunge band. Nate had been listening to Trampled By Turtles, Old Crow Medicine Show, and older bluegrass acts and the two wanted to put their own spin on tradition. This also marked Nate’s very first go at singing. They wrote some originals and tested them out at open mics. Shortly after, Colton, who was into metal, and Scott, more in the singer-songwriter vein, added more bodies to The Dead South. Colton learned banjo and Scott switched from guitar to mandolin. The result was their own unique take on the Bluegrass genre, as none of them actually had any clue what they were doing. But they knew they wanted it to be fun, somewhat tongue-in-cheek, with serious musicianship.

The Hooten Hallers

Columbia, Missouri trio The Hooten Hallers are a high-energy blues, rock, and soul band known for hard-traveling and wild live shows, with a seemingly endless tour schedule. The myriad of influences in their music range from pre-war blues to rock'n'roll to honky tonk and a hint of jazz, with a thematic penchant for the strange and the unexplained. In the same vein, the Hooten Hallers’ music isn’t quite Americana and it’s not quite punk, but a bit of both, fused together in a drunken tangle. Their live shows take the listener on a seamless ride from unapologetically raucous blues on the lap steel and bass sax, to a sweet three part harmony country ballad, to a romping dance number.

The Hooten Hallers’ new self-titled album, out April 21, 2017 on Big Muddy Records, is the culmination of their experiences from 10 years of performing and traveling together. They’ve injected the album with the stories and characters they’ve been meeting on the road all this time. Produced by Johnny Walker (Soledad Brothers, All Seeing Eyes) and Kristo Baricevic (Big Muddy Records), the Hooten Hallers' latest effort showcases their evolution as musicians and songwriters. It garnered attention by Noisey - "This album rules"; Rock'N'Reel (UK) - "This is a band that really understands and exudes the history of rock and roll"; Impose Magazine - "another stunner of a music collection"; New Releases Now - "one of the most dynamic live shows around"; AXS - "This album is sheer madness in the best way"; Ground Sounds - "gritty, groovy, and bluesy"; No Depression - "evokes images of Tom Waits tending to a trotline at Lake of the Ozarks", amongst others.

John Randall’s demonically-tinged vocals and blues-inspired, manic guitar, and Andy Rehm's screaming falsetto vocals and steady, pounding drum beat keep the band focused on their unique blend of deep blues and country punk. Kellie Everett brings the power with the deep rumble of her baritone and bass saxophones. When The Hooten Hallers come to town, you know it’s gonna be a party!

Philadelphia's Black Horse Motel crafts its genre-fluid city folk sound by taking traditional folk instrumentation and lyrics, blending them with Americana roots, rock, blues, and country influences and tying it all together with rich vocal harmonies. The resulting sound is infectiously foot-stomping, heart-breaking, familiar and new.

$20 - $25

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