Soundstage LIVE! Video Shoot at MadLife

Soundstage LIVE!
Presenting original artists to the world.

Call it inspiration, creativity or destiny, the spark that ignites original music brings sonic gifts to all of us – musicians and music lovers alike.

Soundstage LIVE! evenings at MadLife feature the most exceptional of the original artists who have taken our stage. These are nights of powerful words and music, with every artists’ performance being captured by MadLife engineers via our superb audio & video recording systems. Most Soundstage LIVE! shows feature 6 original artists / original bands, performing songs that offer honest windows into their hearts and minds.

Given Soundstage LIVE! performances are being captured for future publication, filling our venue with music lovers is vital to creating the awesome vibe of the night. Be part of an exclusive audience to experience heartfelt original performances and music history in the making. Be at MadLife for Soundstage LIVE!

Surrender Hill

Years before forming the Americana duo Surrender Hill, songwriters Robin Dean Salmon and Afton Seekins chased their own muses as solo artists.

Salmon was an award-nominated punk rock frontman who'd spent the first half of his adolescence in South Africa. During the early '80s, his family relocated to a longhorn ranch in Texas, where Salmon found himself listening to a cross-cultural mix of Bob Wills, the Sex Pistols, Marty Robbins and the Clash. He took up songwriting at 15 years old, launched the band See No Evil soon after high school, and later moved the group to New York City, landing a major-label deal with Sony Music in the process. A decade later, though, Salmon found himself drawn to the rootsy sounds he'd heard as a child on the ranch, where cattle workers would strum country songs after a hard day's work. Inspired, he relaunched a career as an alt-country songwriter, eventually crossing paths with Seekins — his future bandmate and wife — while playing shows in Sedona.

Meanwhile, Seekins grew up splitting her time between an Alaskan fishing village and an Arizona frontier town. Summers were spent in one location; school years were spent in another. Throughout it all, she honed her talent for dancing, eventually moving to New York during her 20s and finding success as a choreographer. Unable to resist the need to pursue songwriting, she later headed back to Arizona, where she turned the contents of her personal journal into the lyrics of her very first songs.

Separately, Salmon and Seekins are strong, sharp-voiced musicians, with songs inspired by their colorful and unusual backgrounds. Together, they're something bigger: a soulful, countrified duo whose music nods not only to America's rural pockets, but also to the world at large. Appropriately, the group takes its name from the real-life Surrender Hill in South Africa, where the Anglo-Boer War came to a close. After all, this a band of songwriters who've fought their own battles and suffered their own scars, only to surrender to — and find peace with — each other.

On their third album, Tore Down Fences, the members of Surrender Hill unpack the skeletons in their closets, leaning on one another for support. Like the two records that came before it —2015's self-titled debut and 2017's Right Here Right Now — the 2018 release Tore Down Fences is an album about relationships, delivered from the perspective of two songwriting partners who'd weathered their own share of breakups and missteps before crossing paths. Unlike those previous records, though, this album focuses not on the romantic "honeymoon period" of a relationship, but on the challenges that arrived before the pair got together. It explores the reality of romance: the good, the bad, the bright, and the dark.

"On our earlier records, it was clear that we were two people who'd fallen in love and were writing songs together," says Salmon, who splits the album's vocal and songwriting duties with Seekins. "There was a lot of love going on. This new record is interesting because we've been together long enough, both personally and professionally, to start exploring some of the darkness from our lives before we got together. We're focusing on how great it feels to be past that. There's still a lot of love on this album, but it comes from a darker point of view. It's about what we went through, what we did, and what we overcame."

A roots-rock album filled with guitars, harmonized vocals, organ, and the occasional burst of pedal steel, Tore Down Fences pushes Surrender Hill into harder, grittier territory. All 14 songs were tracked in two days, with Salmon producing the sessions in a Nashville recording studio. The fast pace helped shine a light on Surrender Hill's talent as a live act, something Salmon and Seekins have been honing for years, with an annual schedule of 200 shows spread across much of the globe. They've played bars, ballrooms, American wineries, and South African resorts, often trying out new songs in front of live audiences. Tore Down Fences captures that immediacy with tunes like the up-tempo "Get Along" — a socially conscious song, delivered during a politically divisive time — and the slow, swooning title track, in which the two singers present all the baggage from their previous relationships. Together, the songs on Tore Down Fences paint the picture not only of a band that's reached its creative peak, but a relationship that's built on trust, twang, and creative chemistry.

Like its name suggests, Tore Down Fences finds Surrender Hill tearing down the boundaries that surround them.

Angie Aparo is an American musician and songwriter from Atlanta, Georgia. He is currently recording an album and touring with his long-time drummer, Derek Murphy.

Aparo began playing in a group called Angie's Hope in the early 1990s before making the decision to go solo. After making that decision, Aparo chose to go out on the road touring with his acoustic guitar in the Southeast. In 1996, he released his first CD Out of the Everywhere, recorded at David Briggs Studio in Nashville, Tennessee with Jim Stabile as engineer. Burnard Tate played drums.

In 1999, with Grammy-winning producer Matt Serletic, Aparo released The American. His single, "Spaceship," hit the radio waves in 2000, and The American also includes his original version of the single "Cry", made popular by Faith Hill and featured on her album of the same name. Many songs from The American are also on a live CD 9Live that was released in 2004, from a performance for Atlanta radio station 99X, also featured on 99X Live X 6. Faith Hill's husband Tim McGraw also covered "Free Man" from The American. It was featured on an iTunes-only soundtrack release for an HBO documentary about the election of Barack Obama. [1]

While stuck in musical limbo due to record label issues, Aparo released Weapon of Mass Construction (2001) (Later re-released under the title One With the Sun), a CD of cover songs taken from varying artists from Beastie Boys to Neil Young and Elton John, as well as two previously unreleased originals. In his own words, "It was fun, and I got it out of my system." [2]

In 2003, another album, For Stars and Moon, a Beatles-influenced showcase – was released independently.

Most recently, Aparo has put together The Infidels, and is touring the Southeast while recording a new album, "El Primero Del Tres" (Spanish for "The First of the Three"), with producer Dann Huff. The music has moved in a different direction than his previous recordings. The Infidels consists of Derek Murphy (The American, 9Live, One With the Sun, For Stars and Moon, Praise Be), Mark Dannells, Martin Lesch (For Stars and Moon), and Shannon Woods.

Angie Aparo also sang the song "Junkyard" with the Zac Brown Band on their album Pass The Jar – Zac Brown Band And Friends From The Fabulous Fox Theatre in Atlanta (Live).

Last Chance Riders

Fronted by a soulful powerhouse vocal, captivating guitar hooks and face melting leads, Last Chance Riders delivers a timeless rock ‘n roll, high-octane performance backed by an explosive rhythm section.

Inspired by The Allman Brothers Band, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones, AC/DC, Janis Joplin and David Bowie - the Last Chance Riders have a broad blend of influences that result in a unique sound that is their own. The band plays original music and stays busy constantly writing new material. After the release of their first studio album “Jet Lag Super Drag” on June 22nd, Last Chance Riders will be touring throughout the Southeast with a powerfully engaging live set.

The core band formed at a charity festival in Dahlonega, GA. Later in 2018 they joined forces with drummer, Shane Denmark and vocalist, Jessie Albright. Drawing on their exploration of numerous genres, their songwriting is inspired by driving classic guitar riffs with a southern rock vibe.

Self-financed, the band went into Sonica Studios with award winning producer John Briglevich, to put together eight songs including the single, “Downright Disgusted,” which ties together common themes of the album with stories of hardship and endurance. Inspirational lyrics, passionate players and an unrelenting drive has brought The Last Chance Riders to the forefront of the Atlanta music scene.

Debra Lynn Rodriguez

Raised singing in the hills of Appalachia, Debra Lynn Rodriguez draws from a deep well of musical tradition as a singer and songwriter. Her earliest memories are of singing at her mama’s piano, tambourine in hand. She is heavily influenced by gospel, country, and bluegrass music. It’s those roots along with her personal experiences and life within her community which most inspire her songwriting. Debra Lynn released her first full-length album of original music in 2015 and is currently cozying up to a batch of folk/soul tunes, gearing up for a new recording project.

$10

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