“The cut worm forgives the plough.”

– William Blake, Proverbs of Hell



Cut Worms is the nom de plume of Max Clarke, assumed while studying illustration at Chicago's Columbia College.



Despite a .300 batting average and a 63 mph curveball from the mound, Cut Worms' Max Clarke was the black sheep of his baseball-centric, Midwestern family. He was drawn to the creative shadows, drawn to the basement 4-track and late nights in the art studio as much as he was the dugout. He had a born knack for conjuring warm sounds and fine images. His songs in particular crackle with the heat of a love-struck nostalgia: golden threads of storytelling, like visceral memories, woven together with a palpable Everly Brothers' influence and 50s/60s naiveté. But the kid still has a pretty mean curve. Like one of his creative pillars David Lynch, Clarke's songs and artwork are also curveballs with a curious underbelly.

A Cut Worms song may impress an innocent summer stroll across fields of tall grass and lavender — but there's undoubtedly a severed ear out in there in the grass. Some unseen dark forces are always lurking at the edges of songs' sunbursts. Bright, beautiful lap steel or a cheery harmonica accompaniment often belie an impending doom or crestfallen narrator.

Clarke didn't necessarily seek out a life as fulltime musician. Before releasing music under the moniker of Cut Worms, Clarke went to school for illustration with the idea of a sensible career in graphic design, then took on a string of handy-man type odd jobs. Still, songwriting - that semi-secret practice Clarke had been cultivating since the age of 12 - kept gnawing at him. It was the only sort of work that didn't feel like work. Plus, if there's ever a time to do something as unreliable, unrealistic, and imprudent as throwing yourself wholly into music, might as well be done when you're in your twenties.

A number of songs that make up his LP, Hollow Ground, bloomed from his time in Chicago during period of driven creativity. In particular, "Like Going Down Sideways" and "Don't Want To Say Good-Bye" find new life on Hollow Ground, polished from their initial appearances on Cut Worms' 2017 introductory Alien Sunset EP. Both still fizzle with a lo-fi 60s sound, but cleaned up, they gleam.

The remainder of Hollow Ground was written in Clarke's current home in Brooklyn, where he still home-demos songs. The record was recorded partially in Los Angeles at the home studio of Foxygen's Jonathan Rado, and partially in New York with Jason Finkel at Gary's Electric. Clarke, who plays keyboards, bass, and lap steel in addition to his main guitar, handled most of the instrumentation across the set. He explains he's always strove toward a specific musical aesthetic, and Hollow Ground marks the closest he's gotten to hitting it thus far.

Hollow Ground is imbued with a sharp, self-aware lyricism; as strong as the music is here, Clarke shows an affinity for evocative storytelling, striking the balance between cerebral and simplicity. Look no further than the chiming, rollicking standout "Cash For Gold." For a song with so much sock hop energy, it's actually about being trapped in one's introvert head — stuck on the couch or against the wall at the edges of the dance floor.

Sometimes, on Hollow Ground, we find characters impossibly lustful, sometimes brooding, while in other parts they fumble along, hopeful and painfully self-aware. If the music can be said to have any sort of through-line, it revolves around Clarke's obvious delight in singing his heart out through varying degrees of agony. His songwriting both evokes and explores the raw realm of youth, its weightlessness and possibilities, but channels it through the lens of someone more restrained, who's been through it all before. Someone who's old enough to know better but still gets drawn back in to the romanticism of teenage feelings - and knows how to take the listener along, too.

Hailed as “The Beach Boys on Robitussin”, Shy Boys (brothers Collin & Kyle Rausch, Konnor Ervin, Kyle Little & Ross Brown) were bred in the dankest basements of Kansas City, MO as a group of ill-fitting squares in a scene of punks and weirdos. We find these great friends now, still living & loving in KC, trading instruments while creating melodic, happy-sad tunes to make your heart swell. Shy Boys’ sophomore album will arrive later this year on Polyvinyl Record Co., bringing with it big, melancholic vocal harmonies of a past’s present, amidst these strange and bittersweet future daze.

Since coming together in 2015, Nashville four-piece The Medium have crafted melodic, intricate pop rock tailor-made for summer nights and sweaty house shows. On their debut album Get It While It's Hot, the band brings together their eclectic musical influences and humorous, big- hearted takes on life and love for their first proper full-length statement.

Comprising Sam Silva, Shane Perry, Michael Brudi and Jared Hicks, The Medium met by happenstance in and around Nashville, and have spent the intervening years playing live and honing their sound, which pulls from the best of '60s pop and psychedelia, '70s rock, and current- day lo-fi and DIY.

The band wrote Get It While It's Hot in 2016 at their shared home, the Chapel House, and finished recording the tracks in the summer of 2018 in a buddy's garage and at their own home, with production from friend and frequent collaborator Jake Davis, another Nashvillian also known for his work with Rainsticks. Since then, the tracks have had plenty of time to marinate, with the band playing them around town, on the road and in jam-packed house show living rooms.

Opening track "Caroline" shimmers with crystalline vocals and gauzy guitar, turning a tale of heartbreak into a breezy sing-along that's sure to be a staple of live shows. Early single "The Groove" refracts the woozy experimentation of Sgt. Pepper through a modern indie lens. Closer "Good Ol' Days" is, as the band describes it, the quintessential The Medium song, heavy on rose- tinted nostalgia and even heavier on tasty vocal harmonies.

Lyrically, the band splits up songwriting duties between Silva and Perry, with Get It While It's Hot's narratives showing both their sense of humor ("Some of it's just a bunch of gobbledy-gook," Perry offers) and their honest introspection. "We like to draw inspiration from real things, but there's some nonsense, some gibberish thrown in there, too," Silva says, with Perry adding, "Some of the songs have a basis in reality, but then turn into spaghetti fun."

Spaghetti fun with a side dish of reality well sums up Get It While It's Hot. The album is a colorful, kaleidoscopic look at the real world as seen by The Medium, and is a hell of a lot more fun than reality ever will be.

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