Grand Ole Echo - Caleb Caudle

"THE STONED, STEELY SOUNDS OF '70S COUNTRY MUSIC LIVE ON IN ECHO PARK — ON SUNDAY AFTERNOONS, AT LEAST. BREEZY AND BOOZY VIBES ABOUND AT THE ECHO EVERY SUNDAY AFTERNOON FROM SPRING TO FALL AT GRAND OLE ECHO, AN OPEN-ENDED COUNTRY SHOWCASE THAT FEATURES ALL MANNER OF BUZZED OUTLAWS AND COUNTRY-FRIED SONGWRITERS BUT ZEROES IN ON THE HAZY DAYS OF WILLIE AND WAYLON AND RONSTADT. THE PARTY TAKES ADVANTAGE OF BOTH THE ECHO'S MAIN PERFORMANCE SPACE AND ITS SUNNY BACK PATIO, WHERE RAY'S BACK PATIO BBQ SERVES UP SLOW-ROASTED PORK ON A WHITE HAMBURGER BUN FOR $6 A POP. KIDS ARE WELCOME AND RUN FREE WITH JOYOUS ABANDON; HANDSOME YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN LOUNGE AROUND WITH CANS OF BUD; VINTAGE WESTERN SHIRTS AND COWBOY BOOTS HANG FOR SALE ON RACKS BY THE SIDE OF THE STAGE. IT'S THE MUSIC, THOUGH, THAT KEEPS FANS COMING BACK EVERY WEEK, WITH HOT-SHOT LOCAL ACTS SUCH AS COUNTRY-FRIED ROCKER ELIJAH OCEAN AND THE FLAWLESS BLUEGRASS HARMONIES OF DEAR LEMON TREES SHARING THE STAGE WITH TOURING AMERICANA ACTS. CAN'T-MISS SPECIAL TRIBUTES, LIKE THOSE DEDICATED TO MERLE HAGGARD AND TOWNES VAN ZANDT EARLIER THIS YEAR, BRING OUT SCORES OF L.A.'S FINEST ROOTS SINGERS AND MUSICIANS. IF YOU SQUINT HARD ENOUGH, YOU COULD MISTAKE THE WHOLE AFFAIR FOR A NASHVILLE HOUSE PARTY CIRCA 1978".- CHRIS KISSEL , LA WEEKLY

"That's just one example of the type of collaborations in store at the Grand Ole Echo, whose definition of Americana is much more wide-ranging and diverse than its Nashville namesake, booking everything from southern rock to psychedelic alt-country to bluegrass to old fashioned honkytonk." - Jonathan Bernstein, American Songwriter

The Echo Park crowd knock back longnecks and listen to bands that can include (former) local fixture, Mike Stinson,or former members of the Blasters. Members of Wilco, and The Black Crowes have been known to show up and even take the stage.” - Los Angeles Magazine

“Sunday afternoons, put a kick in God’s day with the Grand Ole Echo, a downhome celebration with three live bands plus and old-timey jam and bbq on the back patio.” - The Pasadena Weekly

Caleb Caudle

Growing up in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, singer-songwriter Caleb Caudle was raised on rock n’ roll and Southern hospitality. Influenced by bands like The Clash and Velvet Underground, Caudle was playing North Carolina’s punk rock circuit by the age of 15. Naturally, his music matured with his age and he became more lyrically driven, adopting a love for collecting vinyl. In 2012, he decided to quit his day job and focus solely on music -- five years and four albums later, Caudle is gaining the traction he deserves. He was recently dubbed “the musical equivalent of high-proof bourbon – rich in flavor, with a subtle, satisfying bite,” by Rolling Stone editors for their list of “10 New Country Artists You Need To Know”. He’s played Nashville’s famed AmericanaFest multiple times and his song, “Borrowed Smiles” was featured on last season’s dramatic season finale of CMT’s Nashville. And as 2018 approaches, he’s not slowly down; he’s on the lineup for the 11th Annual Cayamo, the musical cruise that travels from New Orleans to Cozumel, Mexico, and Belize, next to icons like John Prine, Buddy Miller, Brandi Carlile, Patty Griffin, and Lee Ann Womack. And most importantly, he’s gearing up to release his eighth and most refined album yet, Crushed Coins.



Caleb Caudle has always been busy, but in his eyes, things started to really change in 2012, when he released Tobacco Town. While the record was built on a “real shoestring budget” at a friends house, Caudle wanted to replicate the stripped-down feeling of a live performance and gave fans an idea of what to expect. With the intent to tour, he did just that -- traveling around the country playing medium-sized clubs and venues, while simultaneously working on 2014’s Paint Another Layer On My Heart. This time, he wanted to make a bonafide studio record; complete with Lydia Loveless’ sultry backing vocals, the Bruce Springsteen-inspired approach to classic country was a notable transformation in Caudle’s sound. He continued to tour, gaining new listeners, and started garnering media attention. In 2016, he released Carolina Ghost. The album took the leap into real country, in his own words, “About as country as I’ll ever go.” No Depression noted that the record had “a nice progression, sonically and emotionally,” while American Songwriter described it as, “an album that feels pure, natural, and unconcerned with radio play.” Meanwhile, The Bitter Southerner simply put it that, “In a just world, he would be on every country radio station.”



But one of Caudle’s strongest attributes, which journalists and listeners alike continue to find endearing, is his unique and genuine method of songwriting, which Paste Magazine compared to Jason Isbell. “The lyrics are very biographical. I write about what I know, so my albums are a snapshot into a six month window of my life.” From announcing his romantic vulnerability with Paint Another Layer On My Heart to actually finding love on Carolina Ghost, Caudle’s strong lyrical driving force makes him consistently relatable. And his newest project, Crushed Coins, is no exception to that rule. Since his last release, Caudle’s inspiration has shifted; he’s gotten married and has traveled across the country, exploring different national parks (Yosemite, Arches, and Joshua Tree to name a few) with his wife.



Set for release on February 23, 2018, Crushed Coins is a dark and dreamy narrative about following the light at the end of the tunnel. “I think the overall theme of the record is trying to find hope in a dark place. It’s about relying on the people and the things that you love,” Caudle says, who was inspired by soul, blues, and jazz, specifically Miles Davis’ In A Silent Way. However, producer Jon Ashley is well-versed in a multitude of genres, having produced records for bands like Band of Horses, Hiss Golden Messenger, The War on Drugs, and Dawes. While the two have worked together before, co-producing both Paint Another Layer On My Heart and Carolina Ghost, the duo wanted to take a different approach than ever before.



“Crushed Coins is a departure from my past records in a few ways. We recorded a lot of it out in Los Angeles, which took me out of my comfort zone -- having made the last couple albums at home [in North Carolina]. We discussed how albums used to work as a whole, they were something more than just a group of songs,” says Caudle, who describes the album as, “Not exactly a concept record, but a ‘bigger picture’ project.” On the search for a new sound, he decided to include new instruments, in hopes of transitioning from the country purity heard on Carolina Ghost to a multi-influenced and consequently, genre-less, new record. Crushed Coins features over a dozen extremely talented musicians, including Joshua Hedley, Erin Rae, noted electric guitarist Megan McCormick, pedal steel playerBrett Resnick, and bassist Kevin Black (who you probably recognize if you’re a fan of Sturgill Simpson or Margo Price).



Though Crushed Coins is an 11-song album, Caudle originally headed into Mixtown USA’s studio with 23 songs, all written during one of the most prolific times of his life. “We approached this record with an anything-goes mentality, unafraid to do whatever the songs called for,” he told Rolling Stone Country. And while the album was made with the intent of escaping a specific genre, Caleb Caudle manages to be universally relatable with a mix of empathetic lyrics and a pristine blend of varying sounds. If you’re looking to revive your tastes with something fresh, but also like that warm feeling of musical nostalgia, look no further than Crushed Coins.

Todd Day Wait's Pigpen

In 2009, Todd Day Wait put everything he owned on the curb of his home in Columbia, Missouri, and started what would become a seemingly never-ending cross-county voyage. Traveling in a vegetable oil-powered airport shuttle bus, he headed out to California by way of the Rocky Mountains, and ended up in New Orleans. Along the way, he would find collaborators where he could, picking up one line-up for a few states, and rotating regionally. Relying on each musician’s various strengths, Todd would adapt his music to suit them, shifting genres as he did states. Through this process, Todd Day Wait arrived at a musical aesthetic that blends blues, folk, country, early R&B, and soul. In 2012, after years on the road, Todd Day Wait relocated to New Orleans. Today, Todd Day Wait’s Pigpen can be found playing on the streets of the French Quarter and in venues throughout New Orleans.

Smoke Stack Relics

Foot Stompin' Swamp Rock.

Summer Dean

"Once you've heard her faintly twangy voice — it's nearly impossible to forget."
-Preston Jones, Star Telegram

"...You ain't never heard country music like this before."
-Ben Ryan, 95.9 The Ranch

"...deliciously torchy..."
-Baron Lane, Twang Nation.com

Growing up in a small and rural, Texas town; Summer Dean was lucky enough to be blessed with a family deeply rooted in music. It was this kind of upbringing that gives her a distinctly thoughtful approach to writing music; the raw lyrics, bare-boned and honest voice, the approachable confidence you see on stage as well as her sultry timelessness.
Playing the piano and guitar from a very young age, by the time she headed off to Texas Tech Summer was already writing and playing her own songs in the legendary live music scene of Lubbock, Texas.

Her songwriting and voice speak for themselves but to give references through words alone: The traditional approach of Loretta Lynn mixed with an Americana sound ……dark Gospel notes of Gillian Welch…. and the sultry undertones of Norah Jones or Diana Krall - Summer's words and voice are that of an old soul; comforting, iconic and timeless. Hitting the scene at a turning point in country music and undefined genres, Summer coins her music as AMERI-TONK music

Summer is currently writing and co-writing her debut album expected to be released in 2016. She also plays numerous venues around Texas while working to establish a firm-foothold in the thriving music scene of Fort Worth.

Andrea Colburn

Andrea Colburn and Mud Moseley sound like a panther screaming in the middle of the night, like a band of gypsies at a tea party, like a carefully curated hullabaloo held in a Wild West funeral home. Like Doc Watson and the Cramps had a love child.

Just as much influenced by Willie Nelson, Tom Waits, and Hank Williams Sr. as new Country acts such as Colter Wall and the Deslondes, Colburn & Moseley keep somewhat of a traditional country and blues feel all while giving it their own haunting, part Piedmont, part psychobilly spin. Part Flat Duo Jets, part Bonnie and Clyde, this is not a performance that you will want to miss.

Andrea Colburn was born and raised in NW Ohio. After a difficult move to St. Louis, MO at 13, Andrea turned to music and poetry. Highly inspired by Bobbie Gentry and Led Zeppelin, Andrea wanted to learn to play guitar, so her mother bought her one as a gift at 14 years old. She half-heartedly learned and played throughout high school, but didn't stick with music. After life led her to Georgia in 2012, and she was befriended by a large group of bikers and musicians and she met all the right people, she started writing songs and performing almost immediately.

They say Mud Moseley was born somewhere near Winder, GA but this information could never be confirmed. He was found in the woods one day with nothing but a guitar and a pair of overalls. After intensive etiquette classes/reform, Mud was still considered a threat to himself and others and was released back into the wild. Rather than going back to his feral life, he decided to bless the world with his music and moved to the big city. The rest, as they say, is history.

“…sounds as though it were made for an independent movie about bootlegging on humid afternoons in the Deep South.” and "This album manages to sound as sleazy and greazy as its title and some of the songs' murderous characters might suggest whilst at the same time sounding utterly fresh and innovative."

-Duncan Warwick (Country Music People UK) ★★★★★

“Andrea Colburn and Mud Moseley write music that bridges the space between old time country and contemporary issues. Andrea and Mud have a homegrown charm that's a little Johnny and June, and a little Sid and Nancy.”

-The Sound Connector

Bonnie Montgomery

Upon first listening to Bonnie Montgomery, it’s easy to mistakenly assume that you’ve stumbled upon a long-buried track by a legend from the golden era of country/western music. Such is the artistry of this Arkansas native and silver-voiced songstress. Her story is of her journey, but she presents it through a folk/bluegrass/country perspective that’s traditional and timeless.



With "Forever", her second full-length album, Montgomery once again delves into classic country sounds and storytelling.



“It’s a concept album inspired by Willie Nelson’s Phases and Stages,” Montgomery says. “The songs are about life on the road, loss, and the mysticism of West Texas. We recorded it with love and magic in Austin, Texas, at Dale Watson’s Ameripolitan Studios."


Montgomery’s stunning vocal chops and ability to draw listeners in with her natural songwriting talent should come as no surprise: her musical roots run deep. Brought up among the never-ending sound of music that flowed through her family’s Arkansas music store, her childhood was heavily steeped in Ozark bluegrass, Texas swing, Delta blues, as well as gospel and rock and roll. Surrounded by talented musicians that ran the gamut from performers on the original Sun Records to bluegrass greats and opera singers, Montgomery expanded her musical horizons and began performing whenever possible.



Classically-trained and ready to bring her own distinct sound to the world, Montgomery released her first two EP’s (Cruel in 2011 followed by Joy in 2013) before debuting her first full-length, self-titled album in 2014. She traveled the U.S. and Europe on a tour for the album, sharing the stage with artists such as Gossip, Shovels and Rope, Robert Ellis, Hayes Carll, Billy Jo Shaver, Turnpike Troubadours, Pokey LaFarge, Wayne “The Train” Hancock, Joe Ely, Moot Davis, Mike and the Moonpies, Dale Watson, Chris Stapleton, Jason James, and Sturgill Simpson, among others.


2016 was a big year for Montgomery. It kicked off with her being named the Ameripolitan Outlaw Female of the Year. Springtime marked the premiere of her modern folk opera Billy Blythe (written about the childhood of Arkansas native Bill Clinton) by Opera Ithaca in New York. The show won the attention of critics at The New Yorker, The Economist, The Huffington Post, and the London Daily Telegraph.

With the release of "Forever", the journey continues. On the stage and up the highway, through love and despair, and from the Arkansas foothills to the vastness of West Texas: there’s no telling where Montgomery will take her listeners next.

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