“We walked down streets and crammed onto trains, our faces masks of fear. Unsure how to react, we, collectively, did not react. We grieved for a country and an ideal we never thought would die. We grieved for a loss of certainty.
We argued about what we thought would happen. We preached understanding. We advocated for anger. Some people said that we’d at least get some incredible art, other people said that was a small view of a world we were quickly realizing we’d misunderstood. Everyone was right. Everyone was wrong. Art made in precarious times matters as much as we let it matter.
But what are we looking for from the art we enjoy? Escapism? A reckoning with harsh reality? A temporary shared hallucination? Music can heal because it presents the pain of being human as universal.
Love is Love was written and recorded in the two months immediately following the election, but it’s not a record borne entirely of angry, knee-jerk reaction to what America is becoming. Instead, it’s a meditation on love, and on what life means now. Taking cues from last year’s City Sun Eater in the River of Light, it feels very much like a record made from living, shoulder to shoulder, in a major city: weaving psychedelic swirls of guitar between languid horns reminiscent of the best Ethiopian jazz—Love is Love is a distinctly New York record. It is a document of protest in uncertain times and an open-hearted rejection of cynicism in favor of emotional honesty. It is bright, and then, unexpectedly, a little dark sometimes too.
There will be parts of life where we will watch as events unfold and we will feel helpless. We will not be sure of the future. On good days, we’ll have each other. On the bad ones, we’ll turn to the art that helps us feel something. Love is Love is a document of the new world we live in, proof that light can come from despair and hope is still possible. We just need a little help remembering it exists.” – Sam Hockley-Smith

White Fence is one man, Tim Presley, singer in garage-soul band Darker My Love, player on The Fall album Reformation Post TLC and now full-time member of The Strange Boys.
It’s the 21st century man —we’re way past the feudal phase! Yet, somehow, some people still radiate their noble bearing, no matter where they are — just as certain songs are clearly meant to sing from the turrets still. In this fashion, and with high-collared coat turned up against the cruel wind, White Fence emerge from their high aerie to display a shining array of royal jewels each time they unveil a new pop album to the world. The gliss and glitter that sounds forth from For the Recently Found Innocent has a shine all its own, and for Reasons too.

For the Recently Found Innocent is many things — the fifth White Fence album, the first White Fence album to be recorded outside the bedroom fence (with live drumming!), the first White Fence record to be produced for Drag City. Plus also, a sophomore pump: the second time that Tim Presley and Ty Segall have met to record music (does anyone remember Hair?), this time pure and simply committed in the name of White Fence. Inevitably, the collision at the intersection of all these winding roads is a beautiful pileup of deep impacts, graceful lines and open space embodied in sound, White on White, compacted for your eyes and ears to believe.

In the tale of For the Recently Found Innocent, Tim Presley has succeeded in bringing his signature role, that of the hissing reptilian wraith, to the magnesium screen. Moving with the sidewalks in the first rippling of the light, our gimlet-eyed hero is steeped in the time-honored practice of hand-eye coordination known as ‘rhythmatism’; master of verbal acrobatics (always sticking the landing) and palm-reading melodies, where he proves uncannily prescient in tracing where the lifeline goes as moves it through the path of verse-chorus-bridge-et al.

White Fence’s previous release, Cyclops Reap, demonstrated a process being executed at the top of its game (which, we know, is NOT a game). For the Recently Found Innocent surges forth with fresh set of elaborately crafted songs, harmony vocalizations and trippin’ guitar tones that strike the face and viscera with an equal (easy) blow. White Fence conjure a fantasy about reality, of the world as it is and should always be; their songs are alterna-hits played out in green sun, in blue air, on repeat, relentless, RIGHTEOUS in the privacy of front-parlor and yes, bedroom — White Fence, full-circle, from the cradle to the grave!

One listen to For the Recently Found Innocent and (y)our faith is still growing.

Magic Trick (solo)

Magic Trick is Tim Cohen (Fresh & Onlys, Black Fiction), Noelle Cahill, Alicia Vanden Heuvel (#poundsign#, Still Flyin), and James Kim (Kelley Stoltz Band, Court & Spark).

Empty Cellar Records is proud to announce the latest full-length album by Tim Cohen, The Glad Birth of Love. This is Tim Cohen's fourth album following his 2009 debut, The Two Sides of Tim Cohen (Empty Cellar), and two full-lengths (Laugh Tracks / Tim Cohen's Magic Trick) and one EP (Bad Blood) on New York's Captured Tracks label. Featuring guest appearances by John Dwyer (Thee Oh Sees), Grace Cooper (The Sandwitches), Diego Gonzalez (The Dry Spells, Citay), and several other San Francisco musicians, The Glad Birth of Love is the first Tim Cohen album to not directly bear his name, but the name of his band, Magic Trick. Recorded in a tower at Tim Cohen's home this album marks a departure from his signature radio-ready song craft. The Glad Birth of Love is a 45 minute album composed of four epic long-form compositions saturated with Tim's uncanny pop sensibilities and vivid lyrical imagery. Transitioning seamlessly from sparse acoustic blues, to dense bass & oud ragas, to layered of lush vocal harmonies this album is a culmination of Tim's work to date.

"As a lyricist, Fresh & Onlys frontman Tim Cohen clearly evokes the early era of rock'n'roll he also explores in his music. His chord changes are simple without being rudimentary, his lyrics are romantic without being cheesy, and-- perhaps most notably-- his output is outrageously prolific without skirting inconsistency." --Pitchfork

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