PETAL / CAMP COPE

Despite our best efforts, there are some things we just can’t outrun. Everything catches up to us in the end, no matter what we do to hide from it. It’s a reality that Petal’s Kiley Lotz examines on Magic Gone, the band’s latest full-length album on Run For Cover.

Recorded over the course of a month at Studio 4 in Conshohocken, PA, Magic Gone is a bitingly honest look at adulthood, accountability, responsibility, mental health and the difficulties that go along with each of them. “I was a closeted queer person struggling with chronic mental health disorders,” says Lotz of the three year period that inspired the album. “There comes a moment where all the paranoia, anxiety and pain become too much and you realize the structure you built to survive is no longer is going to serve you. I had to make some very big life changes to make sure I didn’t die. It was not easy taking that level of control over my life after spending many years worrying about upsetting others and being the best and most successful person I could be.”

That’s not to say that the last few years have only been negative for Lotz - there were a lot of great moments, too. She moved from New York City to Philadelphia, changed her focus from acting and theatre to music, toured with Julien Baker, Slingshot Dakota, and Kevin Devine, and chose to come out and live openly as queer, which she looks back on as one of the most beneficial decisions she’s ever made.

Still, the highs of her rapidly changing life weren’t able to outweigh the lows, and in early 2017, Lotz found herself hitting a breaking point. Her mental health was rapidly declining, and after a relapse of suicidality, she made the difficult decision to prioritize her health above all else and move back to her hometown to enter intensive treatment for her major depressive and panic disorders.

It was that duality - the valley between the positives and negatives of life that she’d experienced - that inspired Magic Gone and its two halves. Side A, titled Tightrope Walker, features songs Lotz wrote before entering treatment, while Side B, Miracle Clinger, is comprised of songs she wrote in recovery.

The culmination of it all is an album that showcases Lotz’ prowess as both a vocalist and a songwriter, drawing equal influence from ‘70s powerhouses like Queen and Nina Simone as it does modern vocalists like Solange, Margaret Glaspy and Mitski. Producer Will Yip distills Lotz down to her purest form, lending an unprecedented rawness to her sound. Themes of duality even make their way into the album’s instrumentation, specifically in Lotz’ decision to include church organ on it; playing organ was a huge part of her life growing up, and to this day the sound of it inspires both comfort and fear in her.

Born in a backyard in over home job tattoos, Camp Cope – Georgia Maq (vocals, guitar), Kelly-Dawn Hellmrich (bass) and Sarah Thompson (drums) – have become a force in music since forming in Melbourne in June 2015.

Their newly released sophomore album How To Socialise & Make Friends anchors on the cycles of life, loss and growth through resilience and those moments of finding and being yourself. It celebrates the joys of being an independent unit and knowing who you are without any influence from external factors, and non-romantic love felt towards friends; the women who shape you and women working together to find strength in numbers. It has been praised by triple j (Feature Album), The Independent (4 stars), Vinyl Mag (9.5/10), All Music (4 stars) among others. The Guardian’s co-head music critic Andrew Stafford awarded the album 4 stars, saying, “For a generation that’s grown up watching vocal talent quests, hearing the unrestrained gusto of McDonald singing these simple, direct songs will be empowering. In 20 years, young women especially will approach her and thank Camp Cope for encouraging them to pick up a guitar and tell their own stories. And so the baton will be passed, and picked up again.”

Led by the singles ‘Lost: Season One’ and ‘Jet Fuel Can’t Melt Steel Beams’, their Australian Music Prize-shortlisted self-titled debut saw critical acclaim from all corners, including in SPIN’s best emo, top albums in Noisey (US), with Brooklyn Vegan naming them one of the ‘Best New Bands’ and DIY Mag exclaiming, “it’s rare to find a band with the sheer songwriting ability and integrity of Camp Cope.” They sold out two shows at Sydney Opera House as part of Vivid LIVE 2017, before touring the US for the first time, playing through 13 states with Brooklyn band Worriers. Upon returning home they headlined Melbourne’s Weekender Fest and most recently headlined a huge homecoming show at Melbourne’s iconic venue The Forum.

In September 2016, Camp Cope together with bands and musicians from Australia and abroad united for the It Takes One campaign to say enough is enough: no more sexual and physical assault at shows. The campaign continues to drive conversation around safe spaces at shows, including the introduction of the safe spaces Hotline initiative at Laneway Festival.

"What stands out to me ... is her songwriting ability, particularly the way she imbues her innately infectious melodies with an actor’s ear for emotional inflection." --Stereogum

"Despite her habit of describing herself as unsure or erratic on No Dogs Allowed, Gish is remarkably consistent in capturing what it’s like to enter your twenties without a clear sense of whether you’re living life correctly, or what living life correctly even means." --Pitchfork

"In No Dogs Allowed, Gish showcases everything great about her previous releases—her trademark witty lyricism, criminally catchy choruses, and the layers and layers of melodies tailored to perfection—while introducing an even fuller and fine-tuned sonic energy." --Boston Hassle

$15.00

Sold Out

Orders place for the sole purpose of resale will be cancelled. Orders exceeding the 6 ticket limit subject to cancellation.

 

Who’s Going

Upcoming Events
Rickshaw Stop