AN EVENING WITH PAT METHENY

Pat Metheny

PAT METHENY was born in Lee's Summit, MO on August 12, 1954 into a musical family. Starting on trumpet at the age of 8, Metheny switched to guitar at age 12. By the age of 15, he was working regularly with the best jazz musicians in Kansas City, receiving valuable on-the bandstand experience at an unusually young age. Metheny first burst onto the international jazz scene in 1974. Over the course of his three-year stint with vibraphone great Gary Burton, the young Missouri native already displayed his soon-to-become trademarked playing style, which blended the loose and flexible articulation customarily reserved for horn players with an advanced rhythmic and harmonic sensibility -a way of playing and improvising that was modern in conception but grounded deeply in the jazz tradition of melody, swing, and the blues. With the release of his first album, Bright Size Life (1975), he reinvented the traditional "jazz guitar" sound for a new generation of players. Throughout his career, Pat Metheny has continued to redefine the genre by utilizing new technology and constantly working to evolve the improvisational and sonic potential of his instrument.

Metheny's versatility is nearly without peer on any instrument. Over the years, he has performed with artists as diverse as Steve Reich to Ornette Coleman to Herbie Hancock to Jim Hall to Milton Nascimento to David Bowie. Metheny’s body of work includes compositions for solo guitar, small ensembles, electric and acoustic instruments, large orchestras, and ballet pieces and even the robotic instruments of his Orchestrion project, while always sidestepping the limits of any one genre.

As well as being an accomplished musician, Metheny has also participated in the academic arena as a music educator. At 18, he was the youngest teacher ever at the University of Miami. At 19, he became the youngest teacher ever at the Berklee College of Music, where he also received an honorary doctorate more than twenty years later (1996). He has also taught music workshops all over the world, from the Dutch Royal Conservatory to the Thelonius Monk Institute of Jazz to clinics in Asia and South America. He has also been a true musical pioneer in the realm of electronic music, and was one of the very first jazz musicians to treat the synthesizer as a serious musical instrument. Years before the invention of MIDI technology, Metheny was using the Synclavier as a composing tool. He also has been instrumental in the development of several new kinds of guitars such as the soprano acoustic guitar, the 42-string Pikasso guitar, Ibanez’s PM series jazz guitars, and a variety of other custom instruments.
It is one thing to attain popularity as a musician, but it is another to receive the kind of acclaim Metheny has garnered from critics and peers. Over the years, Metheny has won countless polls as "Best Jazz Guitarist" and awards, including three gold records for (Still Life) Talking, Letter from Home, and Secret Story. He has also won 20 Grammy Awards spread out over a variety of different categories including Best Rock Instrumental, Best Contemporary Jazz Recording, Best Jazz Instrumental Solo, Best Instrumental Composition at one point winning seven consecutive Grammies for seven consecutive albums. In 2015 he was inducted into the Downbeat Hall of Fame, becoming only the fourth guitarist to be included (along with Django Reinhardt, Charlie Chrisitan and Wes Montgomery) and it’s youngest member. Metheny has spent much of his life on tour, often doing more than 100 shows a year since becoming a bandleader in the 70’s. At the time of this writing, he continues to be one of the brightest stars of the jazz community, dedicating time to both his own projects and those of emerging artists and established veterans alike, helping them to reach their audience as well as realizing their own artistic visions.

Lines In The Sand

Antonio Sanchez & Migration

CAM Jazz


Perhaps not “all politics is personal,” but for Mexican born and raised drummer and composer Antonio Sanchez, who became a naturalized American citizen in 2016, the criminalizing of immigrants and the breathtakingly casual cruelty in the enforcement of border policies by the Trump Administration do feel personal, deeply personal.


“I feel so blessed and so thankful for what I've achieved in the United States,” says Sanchez. “But at the same time, I feel completely repulsed by what the United States is doing to immigrants — especially to people coming from the South. […] So whenever and wherever I'm performing, I'm speaking out, trying to make sense of what is going on.”

Not surprisingly, Lines In The Sand (CAM Jazz), his follow-up to last year´s remarkable Bad Hombre (CAM Jazz), is a passionate and eloquent statement from a superior artist and emerging social activist. In Lines In The Sand, Sanchez turns his anguish and anger into a moving musical statement, as much a protest against injustice as a tribute to every immigrant’s journey.


“With all the political turmoil and ethnic violence that is permeating the country and the world,” writes Sanchez in the liner notes for Lines In The Sand, “it’s been impossible for me not to pay much closer attention to what being a brown-skinned immigrant with a Latin name from a third world country means to me, as well as the implications for my family and my future children.”


“As I write these words [in July 2018], families are being torn apart at the US-Mexico border in a grotesque attempt to deter illegal immigration (which happens to be at a historical low). Small immigrant children being scarred for life by these inhumane policies keep reminding me of the millions of people that aren’t as fortunate as I have been and whose journey to come to this country sometimes becomes a matter of sheer life or death.”

Working with his band Migration — John Escreet on piano, Fender Rhodes and Prophet Synthesizer; Matt Brewer on acoustic and electric bass; Thana Alexa on vocals and effects and Chase Baird tenor saxophone and EWI — Sanchez builds, in some cases very explicitly, on the social and musical statements in Bad Hombre.


In “Bad Hombres y Mujeres,” which Sanchez calls “a kind of a reverse remix,” he took the bass line from the original tune, “which is a lot simpler in Bad Hombre, and turned it into this kind of almost symphonic piece.” Meanwhile “Home,” an instrumental piece in its previous version, is re-imagined here with lyrics by Alexa.

In fact, the voice is a critical element in Lines In The Sand. As in Sanchez’s earlier The Meridian Suite(2015), it is mostly treated like another instrument — now carrying the melody lines, as in the elegiac “Long Road,” now creating textures with the electronics or the keyboards, saxophone, and bass.


“I like to have that human element in my music,” says Sanchez. “Even though the saxophone can be incredibly lyrical, people can relate to the voice in a completely different level.”


Voices also appear at strategic points in the extended pieces in Lines In The Sand — “Travesia” and the title track, which bookend the recording — adding to their distinct cinematic quality. In some instances — most notably in the dramatic intro to “Travesia,” an audio verité collage of cries and noises from ICE and police raids — Sanchez makes his point bluntly and unambiguously. For the most part, the pieces suggest soundtracks for imaginary films. It’s an approach to musical storytelling that Sanchez had a chance to explore while working on the score for Birdman (2014).


The soundtrack earned him a Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media, and nominations for the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Score, and BAFTA Award for Best Film Music.


“I really started liking the idea of creating a narrative to tell longer stories,” he says. “And in that narrative, I can develop my characters, which are my melodies, my rhythmic ideas, in a more thorough way. On “Travesia” and “Line In the Sand,” I'm really thinking in a cinematic storytelling kind of way.”


“In ‘Travesia’ I'm really trying to evoke the journey that immigrants have to go through. With the intro, which is so violent, I wanted to give [the listener] a really concise narrative of what happens on one of those raids and what it must feel like. The piece then gets really intense sometimes, and sometimes it gets beautiful and very sparse. I really like contrast in music, so I love to go from the most sparse and softest passage to an incredibly intense section, take you by surprise and, I´d hope, take you on a journey.”


The storytelling approach also informs the title track, in which Sanchez includes a fragment of “At the Wall, US/Mexican Border, Texas, 2020” a poem by Mexican-American students and activists Paola Gonzalez and Karla Gutierrez that he found on YouTube.

“I thought their poem was powerful and poignant so I grabbed it and added it to a section of the track that I always felt like it needed something extra,” explains Sánchez. “When I superimposed the poem over that section it gave me goose bumps.


“The journey comes to rest on the story told by yet another voice, that of Boston-based Mexican-American poet, musician, and activist Jonathan Mendoza reading his poem, “Blood Country.” In Mendoza’s prayer-like cadence, “Blood Country” suggests a glance back before stepping into a new world.

It says in part:



I pledge allegiance to staying.

I pledge allegiance to going.

I pledge allegiance to remaining, and longing,

despite knowledge of a forbidden future.


I pledge allegiance not to the blood,

but to the scar. Not to the blister,

but to the thickening of skin,

“This was such a perfect statement in which to end,” says Sanchez. “With Lines In the Sand I want people to stop for a second and think about what's going on with a lot of human beings in this precise time in history, and how immigrants are being viewed, not only in the United States but all over the world, and how those human beings can be feeling.”

Linda May Han Oh

Born in Malaysia and raised in Perth, Western Australia, Linda May Han Oh is a bassist and
composer who has performed and recorded with artist such as Kenny Barron, Joe Lovano, Dave Douglas, Terri Lyne Carrington, Vijay Iyer, Steve Wilson and Geri Allen.
She has received many awards such as an ASCAP Young Jazz Composer’s award in 2008, 2nd
place at the BASS2010 Competition and an honorary mention at the 2009 Thelonious Monk
Bass Competition. Linda also received the 2010 Bell Award for Young Australian Artist of the
Year and was the 2012 Downbeat Critic's Poll "Rising Star" on bass.
After graduating from Manhattan School of Music, she has had three releases as a leader which
have received critical acclaim. Her most recent release is “Walk Against Wind” features Ben
Wendel, Matthew Stevens on guitar and Justin Brown on drums and other guests such as
Fabian Almazan and Korean percussionist Minji Park. The Wall Street Journal dubbed this album as “music that is resolutely of the moment… her innovative range and stellar improvisations have made [her] one of the most dynamic rising stars in jazz today.” With this music Linda will make her debut at the historic Village Vanguard as a leader.
Linda has written for large and small ensembles as well as for film, participating in the BMI Film
Composers Workshop, Sundance Labs at Skywalker Ranch and Sabrina McCormick's short film, "A Good Egg". She has just currently working to release two projects - a trumpet trio with Ambrose Akinmusire and Tyshawn Sorey, as well as a double quartet album with string quartet,
“Aventurine” - which was commissioned by the Jazz Gallery in New York in City and was
officially the last recording at Avatar Studios before closing.
Linda is based in New York City and teaches at the New School and as an active educator she
has also created a series of lessons for the BassGuru app for iPad and iPhone. Linda was
recently award a Jerome Foundation Fellowship and is currently bassist of Pat Metheny’s
Quartet.

• "A major bass voice arrives" - JazzTimes
• "On Walk Against Wind...[Oh] takes a long stride forward as a bandleader and
composer. The writing is intricate but flowing, tailored to the articulate grace of
her band." - WBGO Take Five
• "Linda May Han Oh is a planetary force and these compositions, so brilliantly
crafted, are her gravitational waves." - Nextbop
• "One of the most fluid and instinctive bass players in New York City."
- SomethingElse Reviews

Gwilym Simcock

Gwilym Simcock is one of the most gifted pianists and imaginative composers on the European scene. He moves effortlessly between jazz and classical music, with a ‘harmonic sophistication and subtle dovetailing of musical traditions’. Gwilym has been hailed as a pianist of ‘exceptional’, ‘brilliant’ and ‘dazzling’ ability, and his music has been widely acclaimed as ‘engaging, exciting, often unexpected, melodically enthralling, complex yet hugely accessible', and above all 'wonderfully optimistic’. Gwilym’s influences are wide ranging, from jazz legends including Keith Jarrett, Chick Corea, Jaco Pastorius and Pat Metheny, to classical composers including Maurice Ravel, Henri Dutilleux, Béla Bartók and Mark-Anthony Turnage. Although principally a jazz artist, Gwilym has composed numerous works for larger Classical ensemble that combine through-composed elements with improvisation, creating a sound that is distinctive and very much his own. In the last few years, Gwilym has become renowned for his solo performances, releasing a critically acclaimed album 'Good Days at Schloss Elmau' in 2011 and touring throughout Europe and to places as far afield as Australia, the USA, Canada, Korea and China to name but a few. Gwilym has toured extensively with the cream of British and international jazz artists including Dave Holland, Kenny Wheeler, Lee Konitz, Bill Bruford’s Earthworks, Bob Mintzer and Bobby McFerrin. He co-leads the Anglo-American Supergroup 'The Impossible Gentlemen' with British Guitar legend Mike Walker, Steve Rodby and Adam Nussbaum. He has toured with Classical virtuoso Nigel Kennedy. He is currently on tour with Pat Metheny, Antonio Sanchez and Linda Oh. Gwilym's career is unique in spanning a huge range of musical settings, and the fact that he was the first BBC New Generation Artist from a Jazz background, and that his album “Good Days at Schloss Elmau” was an album of the year in 2011 at the prestigious British music award the 'Barclaycard Mercury Prize' is testament to this. He has performed with orchestras, choirs, big bands, dancers as well as performing with musicians from diverse backgrounds including the classical, jazz, folk and rock traditions. Gwilym has also written music that has appeared on Television and on stage, most recently composing the music for an adaptation of Edward Albee's classic 'A Delicate Balance' at the Almeida theatre in London. He has frequently appeared on British television and radio and was guest presenter on “Saturday Classics” and guest on “Composer of the Week” on BBC Radio 3, and mentored and accompanied the finalists at the BBC Young Jazz Musician of the Year awards on BBC 4 TV in both 2014 and 2016. Gwilym has lead and recorded a variety of different projects. His debut album “Perception” was nominated for Best Album in the BBC Jazz Awards 2008 and has been critically acclaimed at home and abroad. Subsequent albums have featured various projects, and have been universally praised with reviews citing his work as "sublime", "flawless", "impressive" "a marker that few others are likely to equal". Awards include 'Best Band' at the Perrier Award, 'Rising Star' at the BBC Jazz Awards and the British Jazz Awards, and both “Jazz Musician of the Year” and "Best Band" (with The Impossible Gentlemen) at the Parliamentary Jazz Awards. His impressive formal education includes Trinity College of Music (London), Chetham’s School of Music (Manchester) – where he studied classical Piano, French Horn and composition - and the Royal Academy of Music (London) where he graduated from the jazz course with first class honours and the coveted 'Principal's Prize' for outstanding achievement. Gwilym is Professor of Jazz Piano at the Royal Academy of Music, and is very much in demand for his teaching and masterclasses.

$55.00 - $65.00

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