“BMSM might be one of my favorite bands on the planet. With a horn section to kill for, a drummer that can put me in a beat coma instantly, and a knack for hitting grooves in a pantsless stride, they aren't easy to ignore,” writes Joel Frieders of SYFFAL.com and he’s not kidding. For a band with no front man, Big Mean Sound Machine has character in spades. When assembled from every corner of the northeastern United States, the Machine is built from a rotating selection of the finest, well-lubricated, musically brilliant human components all working together in a rhythmic assembly line of creativity. The result is the aural equivalent of positive feeling, “...the embodiment of feeling fucking delicious,” writes Joel. People dance when a rhythm moves them, and there’s no defying instinct when Big Mean Sound Machine is on stage.

“For the listener who stops shaking to pay attention at a Big Mean show, they can find a musical education,” writes Josh Brokaw of The Ithaca Times. Few bands can trace their roots all the way back to a specific set of values shared in casual conversation among good friends; but in the case of Big Mean Sound Machine, honoring the ideas the group was founded on seems more instinctual than an aesthetic choice. The band was formed to move people, and though their sound has evolved since their inception in June 2009, they’ve been staying true to their mission for the better part of a decade. “Incorporating Caribbean, African, and Latin sounds and everything in between, these musicians… sound as though they’ve been playing together since the sandbox days. They transition effortlessly from a collective of trombone, sax, and trumpet to riveting soloists. Then, there is heavy bass before… percussion, guitar, or keys take the limelight, and when [they’re] not playing simultaneously, those who are stepping aside are jamming out as if they were in the crowd with the rest of us.” - Mary Mistretta, UpstateLIVE

At the band’s birth in Central New York State, the founders didn’t know what would develop creatively. What they did know was that they wanted to set themselves apart artistically while honoring the true, primal reason that people make and listen to music in the first place: because good music feels good. Big Mean is contemporary proof that it’s possible to create art that stimulates the body while also challenging the mind to explore beyond the status quo. Their instrumental soundscapes have no overt messages yet they’re anything but barren. “You get the feel of walking the streets in a city late at night as those who are up to no good are coming out of their homes searching for their next score,” writes Bryan Lasky of NYSmusic.com. Though devoid of vocal indoctrination, the theme delivered again and again through evolving rhythmic and melodic brilliance is to enjoy music for its creativity and musicality, and the way it makes you feel in every sense of being able to feel. Borrowing elements from traditional Afrobeat, roots reggae, Ethiojazz, and funk among others, “Big Mean’s [style] is not easily captured by the precise, genre-parsing descriptors of a contemporary music press that’s uncomfortable admitting to being surprised with a new sound,” Josh Brokaw writes. Anyone who’s experienced the band in action knows that their performances are the heaviest and sweatiest, and “everything feels intentional yet relaxed,” according to Joel. “Seamed together by an amazing rhythm section… the core of the group commands attention while providing a passionate and constant groove,” boasts Vinyl Fluid Records, and BMSM proves that a purely instrumental band can stimulate both the body and mind. A polyrhythmic monster with a crisp, constant, unrelenting groove, the band brings together the musical traditions of West Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and North America in a unique blend that reinterprets and reanimates live dance music unlike any other band playing today. “Big Mean Sound Machine make music that's palatable as fuck, combining funk nuggets with dub gluten inside of rasta pasta on the corner of a jazz avenue I can not only enjoy, I would baste my shirtless self in their steel meals on a daily basis if given permission. And if that previous sentence is confusing, you try describing how fucking disgustingly erotically inspiring they make you feel,” raves Joel.

Even today on the brink of releasing their 4th studio album, “Runnin’ for the Ghost” (2016) in fewer than twice as many years, Big Mean Sound Machine has managed to continue rejuvenating their sound while still honoring the core principles the band was founded on. "...With [10] members... Big Mean Sound Machine’s name can be taken literally as well as being a reflection of their music… Fusing psych, funk, afrobeat, acid jazz and everything in between..." Bandcamp Staff Picks’ Firenote exclaims, the band has truly crafted a sound of its own. The release of their third album “Contraband” (2014) added more critical acclaim to that garnered from the releases of “Marauders” (2012) and “Ouroboros” (2011). Recorded live in two sessions in 19th Century churches in the heart of New York State, including Grammy Winning studio Electric Wilburland (which also served as the setting for Big Mean’s 2012 feature-length film, “Dr. Iguana: Live in the Studio”), “Contraband” pushes the band even further into new territory. Working with engineers Matthew Sacuccimorano (John Brown’s Body, Johnny Dowd, Jennie Lowe Sterns, Black Castle) and the Grammy award-winning Robert Hunter (Branford Marsalis, Donna the Buffalo, Raven) also provided a new dimension to the product of a band that has traditionally been entirely responsible for it’s own production from beginning to end. Hunter’s mastery over analog technology, specifically the 1970’s-era Triton console (originally built for Elvis Costello, and frequently used by legendary Zydeco powerhouse Donna The Buffalo) and the 2” reel-to-reel tape machine it feeds brought a whole new dimension to the production, most apparent when listened to on vinyl. However, “dramatic descriptions aside, that raw edginess was what I liked most about… Big Mean Sound Machine because it differentiated the band’s music from your typical jam band fare.” - Cornell Daily Sun

In addition to studio efforts released under the name Big Mean Sound Machine, the band has collaborated with Ghanaian vocalist Yao Foli “Cha Cha” Augustine (Mosaic Foundation) hailing as Cha Cha & The Ndor Band, releasing “Food For Thought,” (2013) from which the proceeds helped to raise funds for the Ndor EcoVillage NGO; “...the production on this record is diverse, tasteful, and constantly intriguing,” writes Morgan Greenstreet of Afropop Worldwide, as is the tradition and standard of all productions Big Mean. Founded by Augustine in his home village of Aklorbortornu, Ghana, the Ndor EcoVillage organization teaches permaculture and other sustainable farming practices to local citizens, farmers, and youth. Production for the next Ndor Band album is already in progress and scattered shows throughout the year are a treat for both the band and knowledgeable Big Mean fans alike. Previously, BMSM released “Warrior,” (2012) with vocalist Jay Spaker a.k.a. J-San (John Brown’s Body, J-San & the Analogue Sons, Double Tiger, Dub-Stuy Records, Club Rub A Dub) under the name J-San & the Big Mean and the band toured later that summer in support of the album. Future collaborations with these artists and others are definitely something BMSM fans can look forward to in the future. Additionally, BMSM hosts the annual “Big Mean I-Town Revue” during which the band backs dozens of locally based Central New York State vocalists for a traditionally sold-out night of showcasing regional talent. It is this sort of community-building that Big Mean thrives on and has sought to incorporate into their creative mission. In August 2015, Big Mean Sound Machine hosted the first annual Big Mean BBQ which was a raging success and promises to be a significant tradition for many years to come.

But the band doesn’t only lead by example, they have a hands-on approach to inspiring others as well. Outside the group, most of the members of BMSM work professionally as educators with students ranging from infants to adults, hobbyists, enthusiasts and professional musicians alike. Within the group setting, Big Mean Sound Machine has led clinics introducing the inner workings of the band to the next generation of musicians. The workshops, which are situationally tailored to any age range, skill set and level of proficiency, indoctrinate participants with such concepts as rhythm, improvisation, cooperative communication, team building, and other crucial aspects to achieving success as applied to music influenced by global cultures. “The Egyptian priests who made men into the regulated mega-machine that built the pyramids would have little tolerance for the inner workings of a group called Big Mean Sound Machine. Even the lowly engineers who plan your margarita maker’s immediate obsolescence would get nervous at the logistical challenges presented by Ithaca’s [largest] band,” writes Josh Brokaw. It’s surely not easy for a big band to maneuver, but Big Mean does it with style and grace, and they want to show you how, logistically and musically. One of the founders of the band, former member Rob Tate articulates in an interview with SYFFAL the musical formula of “layered melodic arrangements that gradually build over the recurrent vamping of a steady rhythm section, culminating in a unity of diverse elements, oneness in multiplicity.” It’s no surprise he left the band to pursue a PhD in literature.

All of the growth BMSM has experienced up to the present is a result of a dedicated following of live music enthusiasts from all walks of life as well as other musicians themselves. The band has enshrined itself in the regional music community as a pillar of hope for the concepts of art for art’s sake, musician’s music, and creativity for pleasure. Word-of-mouth and a hearty presence on the festival circuit along with the group’s raw talent and international presence have earned the loyalty of fans and peers far and wide, evident in the CDs and vinyl records purchased from and shipped out regularly to every inhabited continent on the globe (we’re not counting Antarctica). The members’ virtuosity alone is enough to capture anyone’s attention, and the collective “machining” on display is a rare sight to behold from any live band, let alone a group with so many members. “Imagine taking a huge swig of… deliciously golden hoppy nectar and sticking your tongue straight out and feeling each individual bubble massage and stroke your mouth muscle. But in your ears,” Joel writes. And what keeps people coming back is the knowledge that every show will be unique, yet it will always sound uniquely Big and Mean.

Clinton Fearon & Boogie Brown Band

Clinton Fearon is a composer, songwriter, singer and player of instruments since his early teens. Born in Jamaica, Clinton became the bassist, vocalist and lyricist of the mythic Gladiators at the age
of 19. He was also a session musician for Coxsone Dodd at Studio One and Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry’s at Black Ark in the 70s, two of the main producers on the island at this time. There Clinton composed
some everlasting bass lines for well-known artists like Yabby You, Jimmy Riley, Max Romeo, Junior Byles and many others.

After leaving Jamaica in 1987, Clinton Fearon started a new career in Seattle. Him and some of the musicians of The Gladiators took advantage of the extra time remaining on their visa, at the end of
the US tour, to start a band in the Northwest: The Defenders. The band built a nice following in the area but split after five years. Clinton Fearon finally formed his own band in the mid 90s in Seattle
with local musicians: Boogie Brown Band. Clinton Fearon recorded eight albums with Boogie Brown Band and toured with them in the Pacific Northwest and Europe intensively, but also other places in the US and South America.

Since 2005 and the release of Mi An Mi Guitar, Clinton is also giving magical performances in solo acoustic. In 2012, he released his second acoustic opus: Heart And Soul, which gathers 16 songs
wrote between 1969-1984, while he was a strong member of the mythic Gladiators in Jamaica.

With just vocal and guitar, Clinton is playing his music all over the world, in clubs, theaters, festivals and other cultural centers. Each song of Clinton Fearon is a strong message coming from the heart of a man who is dedicating his life to help a better world to come. With chiselled music and poetic lyrics, he opens reggae to a wider audience who simply loves his beautiful songs.

Sister Carol

Sister Carol was born Carol Theresa East, January 15 1959 in Kingston Jamaica. She is also known as the “Black Cinderella” and “Mother Culture”. She is a Grammy nominated singer, DJ, songwriter, actress, entrepreneur, educator and humanitarian.

Her odyssey began in the ghetto of Denham Town, Kingston in the midst of the exploding Jamaican music scene and has grown to become one of Jamaica’s top entertainers and a Global Icon. Her formative years were spent at St Anne’s Primary School and Mico-Practicing All-Age School. Her father Howard East was a senior engineer who dedicated his life, to his career at RJR (Radio Jamaica Rediffusion), the number one radio station during that time. He was also a very important part of the Studio One and Treasure Isle sound.
He regularly participated in sessions with the legendary “Clement Coxsone Dodd.” These early influences not only left an indelible mark on her heart, but also drew her closer to the infusion of the music industry.

In 1973, at the age of 14 her family immigrated to Brooklyn NY. The thriving dancehall scene of New York City led this young rising star to a path that would acknowledge her talents with multiple awards, television appearances, sold out concerts and movies.

Following in the footsteps of her mentor and friend DJ Brigadier Jerry, her musical career began after winning talent contests in both Kingston and New York. Sister Carol was offered an opening slot for one of Jamaica’s finest vocal trios, The Meditations who had been the harmony backup vocals for Bob Marley.

This opportunity opened the door for her to record her first two records “Liberation for Africa” on the Serious Gold Label 1983 and “Black Cinderella” on Jah Life Label 1984, bringing her greatest talents, personality and vibe to a wider audience establishing herself firmly in the dancehall/DJ movement. During this time she dominated the music scene winning the coveted “Best Female DJ” for 5 consecutive years from 1983 – 1987. With these accolades behind her, in 1989 she established her own “Black Cinderella Record Label”.

In the midst of her success as an artist she continued to pursue an education attending City College of New York where she obtained a B.Sc. degree in education in 1984.

A true testament of her resilient spirit and energy spans nearly three decades in a male dominated industry, Sister Carol is a trailblazer for women in reggae. Her music carries a social message for people all over the world. Her message is rich with cultural heritage and infused with a vital social consciousness that permeates every aspect of life in the new millennium. (Hence her title as “Mother Culture.”)

She has maintained a loyal fan base across the globe from Kingston – to Queens, Ethiopia to England, Detroit, Denver, East coast to West coast - Sister Carol reigns as the Queen of Reggae. Her prolific music career includes over 12 albums, a Grammy nomination for “Best Reggae Album” in 1997, “Most Outstanding Reggae Artist” two consecutive years 1997 and 1998, and “Queen of Reggae” in 2000 in Detroit Michigan, New York City Council Proclamation celebrating Jamaica’s 39th year of independence and honoring Jamaicans in New York for outstanding cultural contribution to life in the city of New York in 2001, Institute of Caribbean Studies Wash. DC – “Cultural Heritage Award for Excellence in Music” in 2004, “Lifetime Achievement” in 2008 in Columbus Ohio, “Roots Women in Reggae” 2009 and others. A showcase of Sister Carol’s greatest achievements includes: 2001 the release of “All I Have Is Love"/Tribute TO Studio One on the Easy Star/Black Cinderella/Napticorn label and recording her first live CD "Direct Hit" for release on the Catapult/ Black Cinderella label.

In 2003 she released "Empressive"cd on the "Black Cinderella label” which was also released in France on the m10 label the following year. In 2004- 2005 she toured France, New Caledonia, West Africa and USA promoting her “Empressive” cd.

In 2006 she celebrated her “Silver Jubilee” as a solo artist releasing a new CD/DVD "1Derful Words” on the Black Cinderella label. In 2007 she recorded a single titled "Dancing Shoes" with Bunny Wailer a former band member of Bob Marley and the Wailers.

With numerous interviews in mainstream media and has been a guest twice on NBC’s David Letterman, Late Night with Conan O’Brien,New York at Nite with Clint Holmes WORT.V., VH1 with Nile Rodgers, Good Morning America with Bryant Gumbel as well as earning praises in the print media such as Billboard, The Village Voice and many others. She was the familiar voice behind NBCTV Night Music with Jools Holland and David Sanborn as the MC. In 1999 Tuff Gong, the label started by reggae icon Bob Marley release Sister Carol’s Isis the Original Womb-man.

Beyond her music career she burst on the silver screen in 1986 in her first feature film “Something Wild” with Melaine Griffths and Jeff Daniels followed by “Married to the Mob” with Michelle Pfeiffer, Dean Sockwell and Matthew Modine in 1988 and most recently Oscar nominated “Rachel Getting Married” with Anne Hathaway. All three movies directed by the awarding Director Jonathan Demme.

As well as an amazing professional career her personal life stands firm. She has been married for over two decades and is a dedicated mother of four and a dotting grandmother of six, her true pride and joy.

On the Horizon - Sister Carol continues her entrepreneurial spirit - with her “Black Cinderella” clothing line with a CD produced by Glen Adams of Hippie Boys and Wailers fame and a duet cd of collaboration with many other artiste in the works for release soon. Sister Carol also appears in the soon to be released Bob Marley documentary “Stay with the rhythm”. Sister Carol is a Warrior Queen and a true Renaissance woman who continues to tour the world and teach her message in her musical classrooms. The majestical vibrations continue.

The Meditations

Known internationally as Jamaica’s legendary harmony trio, the Meditations have captured the hearts of Reggae fans globally. This led to collaborations with Lee Scratch Perry. Scratch, who were producing for Bob Marley And The Wailers at the time, asked them to do background vocals on Punky Reggae Party with Bob on lead vocals. Bob Marley was so pleased with their harmony that he went in search for the group to do more backing vocals for him. He requested harmony and background vocals on songs like Rastaman Live Up and Blackman Redemption. In fact, The Meditations’ harmonic vocals can be heard on some of your favorite tracks such as Bongo Man , Youths Them A Cry by Jimmy Cliff and Mr. Cop by Gregory Isaacs to name a few.

Double Tiger is producer/vocalist Jay Spaker. Co-Founder at Dub-Stuy Records. One half of Tour De Force. Guitarist & vocals with John Browns Body. Past productions include artists Luciano, Johnny Osbourne, Sly & Robbie, Rankin Joe, Brother Culture, Jahdan Blakkamoore, Omar Perry and more. Inspired by Kurosawa films, King Tubby and Vibration comes Double Tiger. The recent Double Tiger album, Sharp & Ready (Easy Star Records) Debuted at #3 on the Itunes charts & #5 on the Billboard charts.

“BMSM might be one of my favorite bands on the planet. With a horn section to kill for, a drummer that can put me in a beat coma instantly, and a knack for hitting grooves in a pantsless stride, they aren't easy to ignore,” writes Joel Frieders of SYFFAL.com and he’s not kidding. For a band with no front man, Big Mean Sound Machine has character in spades. When assembled from every corner of the northeastern United States, the Machine is built from a rotating selection of the finest, well-lubricated, musically brilliant human components all working together in a rhythmic assembly line of creativity. The result is the aural equivalent of positive feeling, “...the embodiment of feeling fucking delicious,” writes Joel. People dance when a rhythm moves them, and there’s no defying instinct when Big Mean Sound Machine is on stage.

“For the listener who stops shaking to pay attention at a Big Mean show, they can find a musical education,” writes Josh Brokaw of The Ithaca Times. Few bands can trace their roots all the way back to a specific set of values shared in casual conversation among good friends; but in the case of Big Mean Sound Machine, honoring the ideas the group was founded on seems more instinctual than an aesthetic choice. The band was formed to move people, and though their sound has evolved since their inception in June 2009, they’ve been staying true to their mission for the better part of a decade. “Incorporating Caribbean, African, and Latin sounds and everything in between, these musicians… sound as though they’ve been playing together since the sandbox days. They transition effortlessly from a collective of trombone, sax, and trumpet to riveting soloists. Then, there is heavy bass before… percussion, guitar, or keys take the limelight, and when [they’re] not playing simultaneously, those who are stepping aside are jamming out as if they were in the crowd with the rest of us.” - Mary Mistretta, UpstateLIVE

At the band’s birth in Central New York State, the founders didn’t know what would develop creatively. What they did know was that they wanted to set themselves apart artistically while honoring the true, primal reason that people make and listen to music in the first place: because good music feels good. Big Mean is contemporary proof that it’s possible to create art that stimulates the body while also challenging the mind to explore beyond the status quo. Their instrumental soundscapes have no overt messages yet they’re anything but barren. “You get the feel of walking the streets in a city late at night as those who are up to no good are coming out of their homes searching for their next score,” writes Bryan Lasky of NYSmusic.com. Though devoid of vocal indoctrination, the theme delivered again and again through evolving rhythmic and melodic brilliance is to enjoy music for its creativity and musicality, and the way it makes you feel in every sense of being able to feel. Borrowing elements from traditional Afrobeat, roots reggae, Ethiojazz, and funk among others, “Big Mean’s [style] is not easily captured by the precise, genre-parsing descriptors of a contemporary music press that’s uncomfortable admitting to being surprised with a new sound,” Josh Brokaw writes. Anyone who’s experienced the band in action knows that their performances are the heaviest and sweatiest, and “everything feels intentional yet relaxed,” according to Joel. “Seamed together by an amazing rhythm section… the core of the group commands attention while providing a passionate and constant groove,” boasts Vinyl Fluid Records, and BMSM proves that a purely instrumental band can stimulate both the body and mind. A polyrhythmic monster with a crisp, constant, unrelenting groove, the band brings together the musical traditions of West Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and North America in a unique blend that reinterprets and reanimates live dance music unlike any other band playing today. “Big Mean Sound Machine make music that's palatable as fuck, combining funk nuggets with dub gluten inside of rasta pasta on the corner of a jazz avenue I can not only enjoy, I would baste my shirtless self in their steel meals on a daily basis if given permission. And if that previous sentence is confusing, you try describing how fucking disgustingly erotically inspiring they make you feel,” raves Joel.

Even today on the brink of releasing their 4th studio album, “Runnin’ for the Ghost” (2016) in fewer than twice as many years, Big Mean Sound Machine has managed to continue rejuvenating their sound while still honoring the core principles the band was founded on. "...With [10] members... Big Mean Sound Machine’s name can be taken literally as well as being a reflection of their music… Fusing psych, funk, afrobeat, acid jazz and everything in between..." Bandcamp Staff Picks’ Firenote exclaims, the band has truly crafted a sound of its own. The release of their third album “Contraband” (2014) added more critical acclaim to that garnered from the releases of “Marauders” (2012) and “Ouroboros” (2011). Recorded live in two sessions in 19th Century churches in the heart of New York State, including Grammy Winning studio Electric Wilburland (which also served as the setting for Big Mean’s 2012 feature-length film, “Dr. Iguana: Live in the Studio”), “Contraband” pushes the band even further into new territory. Working with engineers Matthew Sacuccimorano (John Brown’s Body, Johnny Dowd, Jennie Lowe Sterns, Black Castle) and the Grammy award-winning Robert Hunter (Branford Marsalis, Donna the Buffalo, Raven) also provided a new dimension to the product of a band that has traditionally been entirely responsible for it’s own production from beginning to end. Hunter’s mastery over analog technology, specifically the 1970’s-era Triton console (originally built for Elvis Costello, and frequently used by legendary Zydeco powerhouse Donna The Buffalo) and the 2” reel-to-reel tape machine it feeds brought a whole new dimension to the production, most apparent when listened to on vinyl. However, “dramatic descriptions aside, that raw edginess was what I liked most about… Big Mean Sound Machine because it differentiated the band’s music from your typical jam band fare.” - Cornell Daily Sun

In addition to studio efforts released under the name Big Mean Sound Machine, the band has collaborated with Ghanaian vocalist Yao Foli “Cha Cha” Augustine (Mosaic Foundation) hailing as Cha Cha & The Ndor Band, releasing “Food For Thought,” (2013) from which the proceeds helped to raise funds for the Ndor EcoVillage NGO; “...the production on this record is diverse, tasteful, and constantly intriguing,” writes Morgan Greenstreet of Afropop Worldwide, as is the tradition and standard of all productions Big Mean. Founded by Augustine in his home village of Aklorbortornu, Ghana, the Ndor EcoVillage organization teaches permaculture and other sustainable farming practices to local citizens, farmers, and youth. Production for the next Ndor Band album is already in progress and scattered shows throughout the year are a treat for both the band and knowledgeable Big Mean fans alike. Previously, BMSM released “Warrior,” (2012) with vocalist Jay Spaker a.k.a. J-San (John Brown’s Body, J-San & the Analogue Sons, Double Tiger, Dub-Stuy Records, Club Rub A Dub) under the name J-San & the Big Mean and the band toured later that summer in support of the album. Future collaborations with these artists and others are definitely something BMSM fans can look forward to in the future. Additionally, BMSM hosts the annual “Big Mean I-Town Revue” during which the band backs dozens of locally based Central New York State vocalists for a traditionally sold-out night of showcasing regional talent. It is this sort of community-building that Big Mean thrives on and has sought to incorporate into their creative mission. In August 2015, Big Mean Sound Machine hosted the first annual Big Mean BBQ which was a raging success and promises to be a significant tradition for many years to come.

But the band doesn’t only lead by example, they have a hands-on approach to inspiring others as well. Outside the group, most of the members of BMSM work professionally as educators with students ranging from infants to adults, hobbyists, enthusiasts and professional musicians alike. Within the group setting, Big Mean Sound Machine has led clinics introducing the inner workings of the band to the next generation of musicians. The workshops, which are situationally tailored to any age range, skill set and level of proficiency, indoctrinate participants with such concepts as rhythm, improvisation, cooperative communication, team building, and other crucial aspects to achieving success as applied to music influenced by global cultures. “The Egyptian priests who made men into the regulated mega-machine that built the pyramids would have little tolerance for the inner workings of a group called Big Mean Sound Machine. Even the lowly engineers who plan your margarita maker’s immediate obsolescence would get nervous at the logistical challenges presented by Ithaca’s [largest] band,” writes Josh Brokaw. It’s surely not easy for a big band to maneuver, but Big Mean does it with style and grace, and they want to show you how, logistically and musically. One of the founders of the band, former member Rob Tate articulates in an interview with SYFFAL the musical formula of “layered melodic arrangements that gradually build over the recurrent vamping of a steady rhythm section, culminating in a unity of diverse elements, oneness in multiplicity.” It’s no surprise he left the band to pursue a PhD in literature.

All of the growth BMSM has experienced up to the present is a result of a dedicated following of live music enthusiasts from all walks of life as well as other musicians themselves. The band has enshrined itself in the regional music community as a pillar of hope for the concepts of art for art’s sake, musician’s music, and creativity for pleasure. Word-of-mouth and a hearty presence on the festival circuit along with the group’s raw talent and international presence have earned the loyalty of fans and peers far and wide, evident in the CDs and vinyl records purchased from and shipped out regularly to every inhabited continent on the globe (we’re not counting Antarctica). The members’ virtuosity alone is enough to capture anyone’s attention, and the collective “machining” on display is a rare sight to behold from any live band, let alone a group with so many members. “Imagine taking a huge swig of… deliciously golden hoppy nectar and sticking your tongue straight out and feeling each individual bubble massage and stroke your mouth muscle. But in your ears,” Joel writes. And what keeps people coming back is the knowledge that every show will be unique, yet it will always sound uniquely Big and Mean.

Mosaic Foundation

With a style as unique as its members are diverse, Mosaic Foundation is forward thinking reggae that stays true to the roots. Formed in 2009 and based in the Finger Lakes region of New York, the band has grown a loyal following, thanks to electric live performances and three studio releases. Blending roots, ska, dub, dance-hall and beyond, Mosaic is an exploration in reggae that is pushed to the limits and sometimes spills over. With lyrics that inspire dancing in the moment, and activate the mind in reflection, the songs encourage positivity, sustainable living and community.

Central New York's finest Roots Rock Soul Reggae Party! Root SHOCK was formed in winter of 2012 with veteran musicians whose love of Reggae music flows deep. Bringing Roots Reggae, Dancehall, Heavy Drum and Bass and Soulful Vocals into positive dance music that makes you want to move.

Thousands Of One

A band born to change society through music, Thousands of One core members' first gig was in a maximum security youth prison. At one point, Jhakeem gave the mic to one of the inmates who let his voice be heard. It was a defining moment for the band.

Liberation time!

Here comes the Freedom Train! Driven by green smoothies and raw sound power, the band on a mission keeps getting called back to do that thing. Thousands of One is, by day, teacher, farmer, social worker, artisan, tech nut... By night, they ROCK the party, til illusions are dust and money meaningless, til thunder roars and lights go out. Have your friends out to see the band and they will thank you for years to come. Have your boss come to the show and you will get a raise. Fear not what you haven't had, this is something you need to know: Thousands of One will blow your mind and free your soul.

Crucial Reggae Social Club

Begun as a weekly residency at The Dock in 2014, the Crucial Reggae Social Club is dedicated to the celebration of reggae history through the preservation of its roots. Featuring members of Big Mean Sound Machine, Mosaic Foundation, John Brown's Body, Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad, Jimkata and more, this all-star group pays homage to the innovators of reggae music through classic hits and rare b-side demos of some of the greatest reggae pioneers in an effort to raise awareness of the roots and beginnings of such a crucial music.

Analogue Sons

Dub/Soul Instrumental

Lee Hamilton - saxophones (orig. JBB, Tribulations, JATAS, Super 20)
Michael Stark - organ, bass, synth (JATAS, TZAR, Super 20, MSZM, Wingnut & more)
Lars Burggren - drumkit (JATAS, Gunpoets)
Aaron Speiser - dubs, melodica (JATAS)

$15.00 - $60.00

Tickets

Dedicated to the protection of Cayuga Lake through a vibrant celebration of Ithaca’s legendary reggae community and its history, the second annual Ithaca Reggae Fest takes place June 22 - 24, 2018 in Ithaca, New York.

Upcoming Events
Stewart Park

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