Solo artist. Frontman. Behind-the-scenes songwriter. For more than a decade, Adam Hood has left his mark onstage and in the writing room, carving out a southern sound that mixes soul, country, and American roots music into the same package.

It's a sound that began shape in Opelika, Alabama. Raised by working-class parents, Hood started playing hometown shows as a 16 year-old, landing a weekly residency at a local restaurant. He'd perform there every Friday and Saturday night, filling his set list with songs by John Hiatt, Steve Warner, Hank Williams Jr, and Vince Gill. As the years progressed, the gigs continued — not only in Alabama, but across the entire country, where Hood still plays around 100 shows annually.

These days, though, he's no longer putting his own stamp on the songs of chart-topping country stars. Instead, many of those acts are playing his music.

Little Big Town, Miranda Lambert, Anderson East, Frankie Ballard, Josh Abbott Band, Lee Ann Womack, and Brent Cobb are among the dozens of artists who've recorded Hood's songs. An in-demand songwriter, he signed a publishing deal with Warner/Chappell Nashville and producer Dave Cobb’s Low Country Sound in 2016, while still maintaining a busy schedule of tour dates in support of his third solo release, Welcome to the Big World. Two years later, he continues the balancing act with his newest album, Somewhere in Between.

A showcase for both his frontman abilities and songwriting chops, Somewhere in Between also shines a light on Hood's strength as a live act. He recorded most of the album live at Nashville's Sound Emporium Studios over two quick days. Teaming up with producer Oran Thornton (Angaleena Presley's Wrangled, Miranda Lambert's Revolution) along the way, their goal was to create something that reflected the raw, real sound of his concerts, where overdubs and unlimited takes are never an option. Also joining Hood in the studio were bassist Lex Price, guitarist and co-writing partner Pat McLaughlin, and drummer Jerry Roe, all of whom captured their parts in a handful of live performances. Hood tracked his vocals at the same time. Stripped free of studio trickery and lushly layered arrangements, Somewhere in Between is an honest, story-driven record — the sort of album that relies on craft, not gloss, to pack its punch.

It's also an album that finds Hood telling his own story. A dedicated family man, he wrote "Locomotive" after watching his young daughter develop her motor skills while playing with a set of blocks. A road warrior, he penned songs like "Downturn" about a life filled with wanderlust and long drives from gig to gig. A native Alabaman who still lives in the Yellowhammer State, he celebrates America's rural pockets with "Keeping Me Here" and "Real Small Town," two songs that fill their verses with images of main streets, open landscapes, hard times, and good people.

Somewhere in Between may be autobiographical but there's a universal appeal to this music. A true blue-collar songwriter, Hood shines a light on the everyday experiences — from family to friends to the thrill of Friday nights — that we all appreciate. It's extraordinary music about ordinary lives, performed with conviction by a man who continues to balance a critically acclaimed solo career with his commercial successes as a songwriter.

"It's southern music," he says, grouping Somewhere in Between’s wide range of music under an appropriate banner. "That's what it represents: the soulful side of southern music, the country side of southern music, the genuineness of southern culture, and the way I grew up. One of the t-shirts I sell at every show simply says ‘Southern songs’ and that's a good summary of what I do. It's what I've always done."

Channing Wilson

"God could you throw this dog a bone. Let me turn the corner and be home. I'm tired of being on this road alone." Real lyrics are what Channing Wilson is all about.

From a small town in Northwest Georgia, Channing learned about real life American good times and hardships. He's not afraid to tell you about it either. From his songs like "Poor Man's Cocaine" referring to methamphetamines taking over rural America, to songs like “Black Jesus" which is a story of two men, one young, and one older, finding friendship in spite of the racial stereotypes of the times. Channing’s voice and songwriting is widely considered in the top echelon of the “who’s who” in the Nashville community.

Born on the wrong side of the tracks to two hard working "dirt collar" parents, he had plenty of opportunities to learn real life at an early age. Channing says "I didn't have a musical family. My mother is a pretty good singer, but an even better worker. So, not much time concerts or record stores back then” Finding music later for Channing didn't slow down his passion for it. Learning guitar at 17 and starting writing shortly after. "I came across a book of short poems my mother had written before I was born, and after reading them I was so inspired to explore my own creative side."

By age 25, he had tried college twice and quit more jobs than he applied for. "I never could accept the idea that I was supposed to work every day for someone else. I expected more than a paycheck. After a friend turned me on to Guy Clark and Steve Earle, I knew 2 things. I never wanted to punch a clock again, and I had to become a better writer and musician." That's exactly what he did at 26 years old, he started his first band and quickly learned the ropes as a very successful regional act. That venture lasted 6 years until he became a father and knew he had to step up his game if he was going to turn a dream into a way of life.

Selling a fishing boat and a decent guitar collection to finance trips from north Georgia to Nashville every week paid off in October of 2010 he was approached by EMI Music Publishing after playing a Tuesday night showcase called Alabama Line. After meeting with EMI a few times he was offered his first publishing deal. "I didn't know what I had to offer such a big corporate publishing company, but when I looked on the roster and saw Guy Clark I knew I was in." It didn't take long before he was in the room with his teacher. Learning from the master himself. "Just knowing Guy has made me a better man, but getting to share ideas and stories is a dream come true."

Channing’s songs have been recorded by artists like Tyler Farr, Luke Combs, Jason Eady, and more. He has shared bills with so many of his heroes such as Billy Joe Shaver, Steve Earle, Robert Earl Keen, Tony Joe White, Chris Knight, Dale Watson, and many more including going out on the 2012 Country Throwdown Tour. He has just recently signed a artist/publishing agreement with Warner Chappell and Low Country Sound (Grammy award winning producer Dave Cobb)

Channing's love for country music, the history, and the future is second to none. "I came to Nashville to make a difference and I'll always work hard to earn respect from my peers.

Erik Dylan, a fourth generation Kansas farmer, packed up his truck and moved to Nashville with a guitar and a dream hoping that the world might someday hear his songs. After countless odd jobs and hundreds of fruitless open mic nights Erik was discovered by country artist Kip Moore at a local Nashville songwriters' hangout, which led to Erik's first publishing contract.

Since signing with Brett James & Warner Chappell Publishing, Erik has written over 400 songs, including songs cut by artists JT Hodges, Austin Webb, Chad Brownlee, Robin Meade, Randy Montana, and Kip Moore.

In January 2014, Erik's first single as an artist "Where the Party At" (Dylan/Archer/Weaver) was launched on Sirius XM The Highway (Channel 59) thanks to radio veteran John Marks. Initial support for the song has been incredible.

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