TAILGATE N' TALLBOYS

Tailgate N’ Tallboys is Central Illinois #1 Country Music Festival. The Music Series is designed with the true Midwestern summer concert goer in mind. Boasting top country acts to span over the summer months all at one low cost ticket price. Our 6 Pack Pass allows entry to 6 concerts for practically the cost of one concert. This allows our Midwestern country music lovers the ability to hit one or all six shows on the calendar and keep the party going all summer long.

In 2014, a cover of "I Don't Dance" and 60,000 video shares changed 21 year old Kane Brown's life forever.

Growing up, Kane was raised poor and by a hardworking single mother, moving around from Rossville, GA to Fort Oglethorpe, Lafayette, GA and finally settling in Red Bank, TN. Kane has been surrounded by Country music his whole life.

Until 11th grade, Kane planned to take the R&B route, but winning a talent show singing Chris Young's "Gettin' You Home Tonight" took him in the direction of Country. After that performance, Kane started posting covers of himself showcasing songs by Brantley Gilbert, Billy Currington, Alan Jackson and other amazing artists, gaining more and more fans as he went.

Kane released his debut EP, "Closer" on June 2nd, 2015 featuring his previously released single "Don't Go City On Me." Get your copy here: http://smarturl.it/KBCloser

On “So You Go,” a song on Virginia-based country band Old Dominion’s upcoming second album, lead singer Matthew Ramsey weaves a tale about a couple caught in an on-again/off-again loop (“She tells you it’s over, this time she means it, she doesn't love you, but you don’t believe it”) but with a surprise twist happy ending. Or is it?

“There are a lot of relationships where you break up, get back together, break up, and then suddenly it works,” says Ramsey.

“It might not be a happy ending,” muses multi-instrumentalist Trevor Rosen. “She might just be getting a booty call.”

“Sounds like a happy ending to me, man,” Ramsey says.

“Or she might be like, ‘You want to come over? I'm going to tell you one more time, face to face, that you're a f*cking asshole,’" says guitarist Brad Tursi.

Concludes Ramsey with a comically sad sigh: “Clearly, we don't know what the songs are about.”

The above exchange says a lot about the playful spirit that exists between the five friends in Old Dominion, two of whom have known each other since high school, Virginians Ramsey and drummer Whit Sellers, who met Tursi and bassist Geoff Sprung (also Virginians) in college, and rounded out by Detroit native Rosen, whom the others met in Nashville, where they each moved to pursue careers as songwriters (Ramsey, Rosen, Tursi) and session players (Sprung and Sellers). In Nashville, Ramsey, Rosen, and Tursi have enjoyed major success writing for other artists, collectively scoring an impressive string of hits (including seven No. 1’s) for such artists as Kenny Chesney, Blake Shelton, Dierks Bentley, Luke Bryan, Keith Urban, Tyler Farr, Sam Hunt, and The Band Perry.

Initially, the members of Old Dominion got together to showcase the songs they had been writing for other acts, but they formalized their arrangement as a band in 2007 when they began to catch fire on the live circuit. “We already knew we were hit songwriters because people were recording our songs and making them hits,” Rosen says. “People were coming out to see us. We just couldn't get a record deal. So we said, ‘Let's go out and play a million shows and build it ourselves. Let's keep writing and record something that we think is the album.’ Then a hit happened. And a hit changes everything.”

That hit was “Break Up With Him,” a sly, hip-hop-influenced toe-tapper that became the first single off Old Dominion’s 2015 debut album Meat and Candy. After going into heavy rotation on SiriusXM’s The Highway, “Break Up With Him” spent two weeks at No. 1 on Billboard’s Country Airplay chart. One of the band’s favorite memories is performing it at the Boots and Hearts Festival in Ontario and having 20,000 people sing along. “We weren't a big name, and we had never been to Canada,” Rosen recalls. “We were just looking at each other going, ‘What is happening? This is actually working.’"

With its offbeat charm, “Break Up With Him” signaled the band’s fresh approach to songwriting. Old Dominion are something of anomaly in Nashville in that they write and play their own songs, and, while Ramsey’s voice has an easy, companionable twang, there is nary a fiddle to be found. The band prefers to create inventive arrangements that are influenced as much by rock and pop as by country. Yet country radio and fans have embraced them. The gold-certified Meat and Candy climbed to No. 3 on Billboard’s Country Albums chart and spawned the gold-certified “Snapback” in addition to “Break Up With Him,” which has been certified Platinum. A third single, “Song For Another Time,” also reached No. 1 on Billboard’s Country Airplay chart. Old Dominion have been nominated for three ACM Awards (winning Best New Vocal Duo or Group of the Year in 2016), as well as two CMT Awards, an American Music Award, and a 2017 iHeart Radio Music Award.

Their success led to an insatiable demand for their live shows. Old Dominion were personally invited to open two stadium tours for Kenny Chesney. “That has definitely shaped who this band is,” Ramsey says of the experience. “We watched him and thought, ‘Okay, we’ve gotta step this up.’” This year, Old Dominion have been on the road with both Thomas Rhett and Miranda Lambert. “We try to learn something every time,” Sprung says. “I have been pulled to the side of the stage by someone in the band who says, ‘This is working right now. What part of this do we need to poach?’"

It was during their endless touring that Old Dominion began coming up with ideas for their second album, which was produced by Meat and Candy producer Shane McAnally. The as-yetuntitled album finds the band excavating lyrically driven, melodic gems with true emotional depth and a nostalgia-laden, happy-sad appeal. “We love feel-good songs,” Ramsey says. “Sometimes you just want to put on something that makes you smile. It’s a big part of who we are, but we definitely wanted to show that we were capable of writing more than just fun, party tunes. We think we have the potential to be around for a long time. To stick around you have to have meaningful songs.”

The album’s first single, “No Such Thing As A Broken Heart,” signifies the band’s desire to deliver songs with a message. With lyrics like, “You gotta love like there’s no such thing as a broken heart,” the song, which is climbing the Country Airplay chart, is a powerful directive to live fearlessly. “Shoe Shopping” puts a unique spin on an old pick-up line (“If you’re shoe shopping, try me on for size”), while “Written In The Sand” finds an unpredictable way to take a story about uncertainty in a relationship (“Are we names in a tattoo or just a number on a hand?”) to a clever, yet emotionally resonant place.

“I think the challenge for any songwriter is to say the same thing everyone has already said but in a different way,” Ramsey says. “Because there are only so many things that people want to hear about, so you have to find a new way to say it.” Adds Rosen: “A publisher in Nashville we knew used to say, ‘The last thing anybody needs is another decent song.’”

In the end, Ramsey says he wants the new album “to show everyone, as well as ourselves what we can do. We made a really great romantic comedy with Meat and Candy, but it was time to grow into making something more.”

“We don't just do romantic comedies,” Rosen says.

“Yeah. We can make dramas,” Ramsey says. “Dramedies.”

“Horror films, sometimes,” deadpans Sprung. “That's to come.”

Finishes Ramsey: “On social media, we see Snapchats of people on a boat listening to our songs. I just want more of that.”

California native and Capitol Records Nashville's Jon Pardi is undeniably country, with an evident influence from country music pioneers from Dwight Yoakam to Merle Haggard. His laid back, fun-loving approach towards life, charisma and authenticity strike a chord with country audiences as he regularly sells out shows across the country and prepares for the June 17 release of his second studio album, California Sunrise. Lead single "Head Over Boots" is a swinging, mid-tempo tune currently climbing country radio's Top 15, gaining Top 15 in country track sales, surpassing 33.6 million in streaming and noticeably, immediately connecting with fans.

California Sunrise is the follow-up to his highly-praised debut, Write You A Song, which landed on multiple 'Best of 2014' lists including the Los Angeles Times' Mikael Wood's all-genre Top 10 and both Rhapsody's and Taste of Country's Top 10 Country Albums. Write You A Song features the Gold-selling Top 10 "Up All Night" and fan-favorites "Missin' You Crazy," "What I Can't Put Down" and "When I've Been Drinkin.'"

Pardi has toured with Dierks Bentley, Luke Bryan, Eric Church, was hand-picked by country legend Alan Jackson for his 25th anniversary tour, and recently, he wrapped his own highly-successful All Time High Tour.

American rapper born on November 2, 1978 in Austin, Texas, and raised in St. Louis, Missouri.

Joe Nichols

American country music singer and songwriter

The Cadillac Three

Nashville
Originally known as The Cadillac Black.
American Country Rock / Southern Rock group

Dylan Scott

Dylan Scott Robinson (born October 22, 1990 in Bastrop, Louisiana) is an American country music singer and songwriter, better known by his stage name Dylan Scott. Scott is signed to Curb Records.

Scott's debut single, "Makin' This Boy Go Crazy", was released in June 2013. Billy Dukes of Taste of Country gave the song three and a half stars out of five, writing that "the native Louisianan can really rumble when he reaches down to hit the low notes, but his performance won’t leave female fans tingling like the greats."It charted for 10 weeks on the Billboard Country Airplay chart, peaking at number 54 in April 2014. The song's music video premiered on CMT in December 2013.

Scott's second single, "Mmm, Mmm, Mmm", was released in July 2014. Markos Papadatos of Digital Journal gave the song a B+ rating, writing that "the song has a Jake Owen meets Colt Ford vibe to it, especially since he displays his smooth baritone and rap vocals."

Both songs are included on his extended play, Makin' This Boy Go Crazy, which was released on February 11, 2014. The EP was produced by Jim Ed Norman. It peaked at number 50 on the Billboard Top Country Albums chart.

Scott released his debut studio album, self-titled Dylan Scott, in August 2016. It debuted at number five on the Top Country Albums chart, selling 9,000 copies for the week.

Ryan Upchurch is a hilarious self described "redneck comedian" from Cheetham County TN In 2014, while hanging with some friends Ryan started creating videos as his character "Upchurch the Redneck". In less than a year he hit over a million fans on social media.

In some of his famous videos, Upchurch sang bits of his favorite country songs. Fans couldn't get enough and would beg for more. In July, 2014 Ryan put out his first single "Raise Hell and Eat Cornbread" which started the RHEC craze. Before long, Ryan had his own RHEC clothing line. Redneck Nation quickly sponsored the clothing line and in no time RHEC merchandise became popular.

It seems everything Ryan touches turns to gold. Recently, Ryan released his hick-hop rap album "Cheatham County." The album was in the top 25 before even hitting shelves. In 2016, Ryan will appear on his on comedy TV show.

YouTube: https://m.youtube.com/user/UpchurchtheRedneck

"People still can't figure out what to call the music we do," said Brian 'Rooster' King, looking at his longtime collaborator Clay 'Uncle Snap' Sharpe. "We just get in there and write about what we want." The duo has been together since 2000 and Outlaw, which is their fifth album since signing with Average Joe's Entertainment, is a watershed effort from The LACS that sonically broadens their musical scope and blends together every genre from traditional country and southern rock to rap and spoken word. But it's their true-to-life lyrics that paint a series of authentic compositions depicting the life of a pair of rednecks from South Georgia. "We love writing about stories that we've lived," said King, of their biographical 12-song effort that could prove to be a breakthrough of sorts. Label it however you choose. They call it country.

Baxley, a slow-moving rural town of just over 4,000 residents, where Sharpe grew up a country boy, is a place where everyone knows everyone else's business and newcomers are known as outsiders. There's one elementary school, one high school and, until recently, only three red lights. "Now we got a fourth and a Wal-Mart," said Sharpe, "so, yeah, we're stepping up." Both his parents worked and, as a young boy, he'd tag along with his old man and spend summer days hanging out on construction sites, while listening to a local country radio station.

Those early formative years is when Sharpe's love of country music developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s. However, it wasn't until he was 20 when a then-18 year old King moved with his family from Waycross to Baxley that The LACS first met up. They liked a lot of the same music – Garth Brooks and George Strait, Pink Floyd and Metallica along with Tupac and Nelly – and as quickly as they befriended one another they started writing lyrics as if they had been kindred spirits since childhood. King was a self-taught guitarist and the two fast-friends pooled their money together to buy a cheaper version of a beat box they still use when they perform on stage today.

In 2001, they saved up another $2,500 to pay for 40 hours of studio time – half of which they spent recording their first self-titled album and the other half of the time was used to mix and master – and 1,000 copies of the CD to sell in parking lots and parties. Over time they built up a cult following of fellow rednecks and hillbillies and eventually drew the attention of Average Joe's.

Last fall they released their fourth album and this spring the prolific songsmiths are already back with yet another studio album, which features the first single God Bless a Country Girl. "It's a fun little song," said King. Sharpe and King have matured personally and especially professionally since the first time they plugged a $7 microphone into a boom box, which still says a lot about their authentic writing process.

Then and now, The LACS enter the studio with half the album written and then finish the second half of the writing process while recording the first half. Their fans, who both King and Sharpe describe as rowdy, loud, hardworking rednecks, have come to expect songs about the south – beer drinking, mud bogging and more drinking – that remind them of their own lives. "Brian and I have prided ourselves on putting out real music that we lived," Sharpe concluded, "and not just writing about some topic because it was a No. 1 for somebody else."

$59

Off Sale

Single Day and Multi Day tickets available. Ticket includes access for 1-individual to specified date(s).  NO lawn chairs allowed in VIP & Party Pit Section. Children 6 and under are free. No coolers allowed, No outside food or drink. Lawn chairs are allowed in General Admission area only.

Check www.TailgateNTallboys.com for all details including lineup and schedule for gate times for each individual date along with all other festival policies. Pre Party and side stage times might vary (be before listed door times), so please see updated schedule on website closer to show date.

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Peoria Riverfront - Festival Lawn