Art is a cyclical beast. The same can easily be said of Grammy Award nominated hard rock juggernaut Mastodon. The group’s four members recognize the importance of life’s omnipresent cycles on their sixth full-length album, Once More ‘Round the Sun. The band orbits around themes of loss and rebirth, twirling a sonic spiral of its signature robust riffing, hypnotically haunting soundscapes, triage of dynamic voices, and thundering seismic grooves. At the same time, this particular collection proves personal for Brann Dailor, Brent Hinds, Bill Kelliher, and Troy Sanders. The very title says something slightly different for each member.
"Quite literally, Once More 'Round the Sun means a year-in-the-life," explains Dailor. "Lyrically, we were discussing things that happened to us recently, whereas in the past we looked further back for inspiration. It's about 365 days in this band. It was a tough and strange journey. We happened to be in the middle of completing a full rotation musically as everything else was going on."
"It's about being a man and trying to survive in the world. You’re facing all of the crazy shit that goes along with it," adds Hinds. "You've got to just keep rolling. It's the daily grind everybody deals with. It's grinding and rewarding."
Kelliher concurs, “A lot of crazy and epic things have happened in the nutshell of the past year. For me, I had recently gotten sober. I really focused my time on writing music instead of drinking and being hung-over. We were in a different space here. Another year has gone by, and we wrote this record.”
Sanders smiles, “The title itself deals with a cycle. Writing, recording, and touring are kickass experiences that we get to relive over and over again. We’ve got the ability to strap it on and go out another time. I look forward to riding this out once more with my three friends.”
Mastodon’s own collective cycle encompasses a staggering string of accolades. Whether it’s the public endorsement of peers as diverse as Metallica, Pearl Jam, Queens of the Stone Age, CeeLo Green, and Feist or unanimous praise from the likes of Time and Rolling Stone, the band continue to make an impression at every turn. 2011’s The Hunter saw them achieve their highest chart debut yet, reaching #10 on the Billboard Top 200, while the single “Curl of the Burl” notched their second Grammy Award nomination in the category of “Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance”. In between scorching stages everywhere from Sonisphere and Download to Bonnaroo and Coachella, they scored the Josh Brolin sci-fi western Jonah Hex and have been sought out for soundtracks including Pixar’s box office smash Monsters University. As far as rock ‘n’ roll goes, their legacy irrefutably stands alone. However, that legacy expands yet again with Once More ‘Round the Sun.
In order to uphold a modus operandi of experimentation and evolution, the boys enlisted the talents of super producer Nick Raskulinecz (Foo Fighters, Rush, Alice In Chains, Deftones, etc.) for the very first time. They holed up in his Falcon Rock studio in Nashville throughout the fall of 2013, cutting what would become Once More ‘Round the Sun. Given his passion for the band, Raskulinecz immediately clicked with the musicians.
“He was very hands-on,” says Sanders. “We were fans of the Deftones and Alice In Chains records he’d done, and we initially met him during the BlackDiamondSkye tour. He literally called Brann every six months reminding us that he was on the hunt to work with us when we were ready. This was the right time.”
“He was like a coach,” Kelliher goes on. “He brought some energy to the band. I remember he was like, ‘You guys are Mastodon. You’re one of the biggest bands in metal. Give me some of those chunky and thick riffs!’ He let us be who we are.”
It’s indisputable that Once More ‘Round the Sun is Mastodon through and through. Kelliher’s twelve-string acoustic guitar ominously heralds the record’s onset during album opener “Tread Lightly” just before crashing into an unmistakable roar from Sanders. Hinds churns out a psychedelic slide guitar solo during the title track that entwines with Dailor’s drums in entrancing, yet enigmatic union. The Kelliher-penned first single “High Road” pummels with an intense polyrhythmic guitar groove before snapping into another unshakable refrain from Dailor.
Kelliher explains, “I wrote that on a day off while we were on tour in Luxembourg. I was sitting in this rainy city on a Sunday. Nothing was open. I felt like I needed to write something to reflect how I was feeling. I started banging on a guitar. I was thinking Neurosis and The Melvins low-tuned with a little more pop sensibility for the chorus.”
“You can headbang to that one for days,” grins the drummer. “I love the simplicity of it. Lyrically, it’s an angry number where you want to see someone destroyed. It’s heavy-handed in that sense, but it’s the fantasy I felt at the time.”
Then, there’s “The Motherload”. Sharring vocal duties between Dailor and Sanders the track cruises from a propulsive six-string onslaught into an riveting chorus—one of the band’s biggest to date. “That one is personal for me,” Dailor admits. “It’s not wanting to lose someone and the powers-that-be are trying to take that person away, or the world is just against it. You’re doing everything you can and scrambling to hold on and salvage it.”
Nodding to their roots, “Chimes At Midnight” sees Sanders call out the words “Hearts Alive”, making a connection to the centerpiece of the band’s critically acclaimed 2004 breakout Leviathan. He reveals, “I never repeated a line on purpose, but I felt like it was time to!”
On the other end of the spectrum, Hinds delivers a raucous and raw departure in the form of “Halloween”. Wielding a thrashed-up punk riff, the song eventually explodes into incendiary soloing from the axeman in homage to his favorite holiday. However, the biggest surprise comes during “Aunt Lisa”, an anthemic send-off to Brann’s late aunt featuring Atlanta femme punks The Coathangers on a rousing gang vocal.
“This one came out pretty effortlessly. It’s about Brann’s Aunt Lisa, her wild spirit, and free personality. I love what The Coathangers did. They’re good friends of mine, and they owed me a favor because I got the Mastodon guys to dance around like girls in their video,” chuckles Hinds.
Brann continues, “My aunt liked anything I did. She definitely lived life to the fullest. If she walked in the room, all eyes were on her. I loved it. I don’t think I’ve ever come across energy like that before, and I don’t know that I will. You never knew what was going to happen when she was around. She had a huge impact on my life. I didn’t get to say goodbye to her properly. This is me trying to say goodbye.”
Everything culminates on the expansive finale “Diamond in the Witch House”. Boasting a vocal call-and-response between Sanders and Neurosis’s Scott Kelly, on his fourth Mastodon collaboration, the track unfolds in cinematic fashion over eight minutes punctuated by Kelliher’s hulking riffs. “It’s about the fragility of taking responsibility,” admits Sanders. “That’s what happens when you have kids. Precious lives are in your hands and dependent upon your actions. The idea spun from that. It’s about proving your worth and prevailing.”
Mastodon continue to prevail artistically, and this particular rotation, Once More ‘Round the Sun, upholds that tradition of progression. “We’ve built a band that’s been able to morph, evolve, and change,” Dailor concludes. “Our fan base expects greatness, but they also expect things to be weird and different. I feel confident that we’ve risen to that challenge.”
Hinds leaves off, “It would be nice if people walk away enjoying the listening experience. That’s the ultimate goal. It’s interesting to see. One thing I know for sure.they can’t walk away and say it’s not original.”

Nature counts the black widow spider amongst its most fascinating and dangerous anomalies. The female arachnid often devours its mate after copulation. It's both a delicate and dangerous predator. In This Moment isn't all that different from this enigmatic beast. Led by frontwoman Maria Brink, the Los Angeles hard rock outfit strikes with a seductive metallic bite on their aptly titled fifth full-length album, Black Widow.
"Black Widow is a metaphor for this innocent young girl who gets infected with life, traumas, experiences, and the balance of light and darkness," explains Maria. "She becomes this poised and powerful creature. That's the album."
"We went into this with the title Black Widow," says lead guitarist Chris Howorth. "It fits the image of Maria as this powerful heroine. If you think of the boys in the audience watching our stage show, she's like the black widow pulling them all in."
The record, the first for the band on Atlantic Records, picks up where the group's 2012 breakthrough, Blood, left off. That album saw In This Moment debut at #15 on the Billboard Top 200, their highest chart position to date, and eventually sold over 250,000 units in the U.S. alone. It also spawned the single "Blood," which rose to #9 on the Mainstream Rock and Active Rock Songs charts. A sold out headline tour, HELLPOP, followed, as well as appearances at the Uproar Festival and Rock On The Range, and jaunts with Shinedown and Papa Roach. After the whirlwind of Blood subsided, Maria and Chris retreated to Las Vegas in February 2014 to begin working on what would become Black Widow with longtime producer Kevin Churko [Ozzy Osbourne, Five Finger Death Punch].
While writing and recording in the studio, Maria and Chris both tapped into the fearless ethos that characterized Blood, inciting their next creative evolution in the process.
"It's almost like I was growing up in this industry," Maria admits. "I swear I went from a girl to a woman. I used to hold myself back, and I had all of these fears. I woke up one day and realized it doesn't matter what anybody thinks. We have to do what we want to do. When I did that, I was freed. We could do this big grandiose show, and we could make the music we wanted. It began with Blood. That's where we started to come alive and figure out who we really are. We let go of any walls and limitations. Black Widow is us doing what's in our hearts."
"Black Widow is a progression from the last record," Chris affirms. "That opened up the floodgates for us. There were no boundaries. We could just go for it. We weren't afraid of any ideas. We didn't worry about anyone's opinion. We approached the music with that attitude."
Their boundless approach shines through in album opener "Sex Metal Barbie." Tempering an industrial crunch and sexually charged synths with gnashing riffs and hauntingly hypnotic vocal delivery, the track instantly transfixes, calling out haters who hide behind keyboards.
"People can be so cruel on the Internet," she sighs. "I actually don't read anything negative about me or the band anymore. I don't let myself get sucked into that. In the end, music comes down to someone's personal perception of what they love. It's not meant for everyone. I wanted to empower myself with that online negativity somehow. I literally went on these sites and read mean things and rumors about me. I wrote them down and transformed them into lyrics for the song. I turned it all around."
"That was the second song we did," the guitarist recalls. "It came from Maria saying, 'What about building a metal song around a cool hip-hop beat?' Everything was constructed piece by piece, and it was very experimental. Once we finished the song, we felt like we had something special. It was a catalyst for more music."
Meanwhile, "Sick Like Me" begins with an eerie buzz before snapping into muscular distortion and a propulsive guitar gallop. Everything explodes on an anthemic sing-a-long hook.
"It's about when somebody loves you for everything you are," she states. "They love you even for what you consider flaws. It's that vision of people who are super eccentric and twisted, but they're perfect like that because that's who they are. They're meant to be."
Then there's "Big Bad Wolf," which bares its teeth with a bludgeoning riff, keyboard swell, and piercing scream. "It was destined to be a faster song," adds Chris. "Maria did this choppy, cool Mike Patton-style verse. It became really intense."
Maria smiles, "I like to say I have the Big Bad Wolf in me and this Little Piggy in me. In my perception, the Big Bad Wolf is the enlightened and loving part of myself, whereas the Little Piggy is the dark side. I have a natural pull towards darker things. It's the internal struggle of those two animals in me, but I realize both are very necessary for all of us. I need to embrace that fire, be wild and primal. That's important too."
In This Moment also teamed up with Shinedown's Brent Smith for the stunning duet "Sexual Hallucination." It’s an elegant electronic-infused piece that drips sexuality and darkness.
"We love Brent and Shinedown," Chris continues. "We didn't think we'd have a shot at getting him, but he instantly said yes. The song is a little different for him, and he jumped at the chance to do it."
One of the album's most powerful moments comes on the piano-driven rumination "The Fighter." Contrasted with the resounding stark keys, Maria's voice proves especially potent. She goes on, "It's embracing and accepting who I am. I used to think something was wrong with me. I've come to learn I'm perfect in how fucked up I am. I wouldn't have these songs to sing or be able to connect with people without that."
Ultimately, that connection with fans is what drives the band. "Their loyalty is incredible," declares Maria. "It comes down to us doing this for ourselves and our fans. We owe it all to them, and we're excited for everybody to experience this. This is who we are, and it's for them."

They’ve hit No. 1 on Billboard’s Rock and Independent Charts and No. 4 on the genre-spanning Top 200. They’ve racked up over 153 million Spotify streams, 20 million YouTube views and close to 5 million social media followers. They’ve shared stages with artists such as Metallica, Linkin Park and Queens of the Stone Age and not only held their own, but won over new fans in the process. They’ve played hundreds of shows for packed-house-crowds around the world, released three studio albums to critical acclaim, and recorded tracks that have blanketed rock radio airwaves. Their sound has broken through obstacles of language, distance and culture. For most bands, such achievements usually mark the summation of a long career– if they’re lucky.

But Of Mice & Men have accomplished all that and more over the course of a mere five years. And while those feats make for one helluva resume, what makes this band really matter is that they’ve never stopped pushing themselves to go further. As a result they continue to reach dizzying new heights, the latest being Cold World, an album that raises the stakes of what a modern day heavy rock band is supposed to sound like.

The band’s most bravely vulnerable album to date, Cold World marks the first time vocalist Austin Carlile has ever written candidly about his experience with Marfan syndrome, a rare connective tissue disorder can affect everything from the heart and blood vessels to bones and joints.

The condition demanded Carlile undergo three major surgeries in the past year—an ordeal he followed up by quitting all pain-relieving and mood-stabilizing medications in the midst of making the new album. “It was one of the most difficult things I’ve ever gone through in my life,” Carlile says. “But when I came out the other side, I had such clarity and energy and spirit, it opened up a whole new world. It made the album mean that much more to me.”

The Southern California-based quintet (Carlile, vocalist/bassist Aaron Pauley, guitarist Alan Ashby, drummer Valentino Arteaga and guitarist Phil Manansala) recorded Cold World with producer David Bendeth, who they worked with on 2014’s Restoring Force, which hit No. 4 on the Billboard Top 200 Album Chart and No. 1 on both the Billboard Top Independent and Top Rock Albums Charts.

Working in Bendeth’s studio, the band began recording while Carlile was still recovering from his recent surgeries—including reconstructive hip surgery, the removal of cartilage from his rib cage, and “having a dural sac in my brain repaired because fluid from my head was leaking into my spine.” To their credit, the band held it together, not just surviving, but thriving in the studio as they channeled their emotions into a sound that cut through the darkness like a light on the road ahead.

“Writing the album, there were a lot of days when we’d jam for seven or eight cathartic hours,” recalls Pauley. “There was a sense of getting back to what music felt like when we were kids and falling in love with that all over again.”

On Cold World’s first track “Pain”—whose beautifully twisted video instantly generated more than 2 million YouTube views upon posting—Of Mice & Men merge blistering riffs and barbed rhythms with the brutal reality of Carlile’s condition. “People who have Marfan syndrome and similar disorders—it’s a very painful beast for them,” says the vocalist. Adding that “everyone you come in contact with is going through some type of pain,” Carlile asserts that “Pain” is meant to encourage compassion and empathy. “The next time you feel yourself judging someone, remember that person could be going through something worse than you,” he says of the song’s message. “Instead of being hateful or projecting something negative, maybe you can think about doing something to help them.”

Another intensely personal track, “Like a Ghost” finds Carlile and Pauley trading off vocals in a soulful exploration of desperation and redemption. “Whether it’s because of addiction, depression or something else, there are a lot of people in this world today who don’t know how to take love,” says Pauley. “The song’s about how important it is not to give up on those people, and to remind them that it’s okay to feel loved.” With its ethereal guitar tones and graceful melody, “Real” reflects on what Pauley refers to as “staying strong when people are trying to turn you into something you’re not.”

At the album’s emotional core is “The Lie,” which features an appearance by Cassy, a 14-year-old fan diagnosed with brain cancer. The band first connected with Cassy through the Living the Dream Foundation, and arranged for a visit upon hearing the news that her condition had worsened. They spent the day with Cassy and her family, then brought her to the studio for a preview of the new album (she was the first person outside of the band, producer and engineer to hear the record). They asked if they could record her handclaps and added them to “The Lie,” an epic track that finds Carlile venting his frustrations about the medical system and “calling out the 1% for not taking care of the people they should be,” he explains. “Now Cassy’s name and the sound of her clapping hands are on the record,” says Carlile. “It’s something that captures that moment and that relationship forever. When we think about everything we went through to make this record, that’s something that we’ll never forget.”

When it came time to select album art for Cold World, drummer Tino Arteaga came across the stunning black and white imagery of 68-year-old Italian photographer Roberto Kusterle and in particular, a stark, hypnotic image of stone-like bodies huddled together. Within days, the band was granted permission to use the photo. “I was studying the image and realized there was a third person in it, who you can barely see because the other two are sheltering him (or her),” says Pauley. “That’s really what this record is all about—that we live in a cold world, but we can find warmth by sheltering each other.”

The band shares an intense bond with their fans, which they chalk up to an insistence on bringing straight-from-the-gut honesty to each and every track. “There’s a magic element to music that you can’t ever gauge or quantify but that everyone can understand,” says Pauley. “Even the most extreme music will bring people together.” And with Carlile’s “becoming so sober and getting to the point of feeling everything” during the production of Cold World, the band ended up creating their most uncompromising and ultimately most cathartic album yet.

“It’s hard to feel these things, and it sucks waking up in pain every day, and it sucks when the only energy you have all day is to play a show,” says Carlile. “But I prefer it that way. I’d rather feel the pain than feel nothing at all.”

A dark, twisted circus sideshow that’s built around bombastically grooving melodic death n’ roll is swinging forward with captivating glee, mesmerizing merriment and the plundering power of lethal pirates toward those brave souls who hand over a ticket to be torn by Avatar and their Black Waltz, the fourth album and first proper American release from the Swedish masters of mayhem.
Within Avatar’s diverse songs, a steady focus on the fluid and organic power of the riff (recalling the thunderous foresight of heavy metal’s original wizards, Black Sabbath) takes flight combined with an adventurous sprit veering off into the astral planes of the psychedelic atmosphere conjured by pioneers like Pink Floyd back in the day.
Avatar has found a footing that combines the best of rock n’ roll, hard rock and heavy metal’s past, present and future into an overall artistic presentation that is thought-provoking, challenging and altogether enchantingly electric. With the grandiose showmanship of American professional wrestling, the snake oil salesmanship of early 20th century vaudevillian troubadours and the kinetically superheroic power of early Kiss, Avatar lays waste to lesser mortals with ease. Whether somebody gets their rocks off listening to Satyricon or System of a Down, they’ll find something suitably deranged here.
“We’re in this weird field, caught in a triangle between extreme metal, rock n’ roll and what can be described as Avant-garde,” confesses Avatar vocalist Johannes Eckerström. The all-enveloping theme park vibe of the band’s music and visual counterpart means that, naturally, “it’s turning into something bigger.”
“I have been in this band for ten years. I grew up in this band,” Eckerström explains. “We’re somewhat veterans on the one hand. But we’re the new kids in the neighborhood in America at the same time.”
Avatar came of age as “little brothers” of sorts of the famed Gothenburg scene that spawned the celebrated New Wave Of Swedish Death Metal. The band’s debut album, 2006’s Thoughts of No Tomorrow, was filled with brutal, technical melodic death metal to be sure but already, “We tried to put our own stamp on it,” the singer assures. While the following year’s Schlacht still contained flourishes of melody, the unrelenting metallic fury reached an extreme peak. “Intensity was very important,” he says, with some degree of understatement.
Where to go for album number three? “We basically rebelled against ourselves,” Eckerström says of 2009’s self-titled collection. “We figured, ‘We can play faster and make even weirder, more technical riffs,’ because Schlacht was cool. But to take that another step would have turned us into something we didn’t want to be.”
Instead Avatar rediscovered their inherent passion for traditional heavy metal and classic rock n’ roll. “We decided to remove some unnecessary ‘look at me, I can play!’ parts and added more groove. We added a whole new kind of melody. It was awesome to be this ‘rock n’ roll band’ for a while. It was refreshing and liberating.”
Black Waltz sees Avatar coming completely full circle, returning to a more aggressive form of heavy metal but incorporating the lessons they learned while jamming on big riffs with album number three. “We finally came to understand what a good groove is all about and what a great fit it was for our sound,” notes Eckerström.
Tracks like the appropriately titled “Ready for the Ride,” the rollicking “Let it Burn” (which dips into some delicious stonerifficness), the anthemic “Smells Like a Freakshow” (a modern day twist of Marilyn Manson and Rob Zombie) and “Torn Apart” are supercharged with a dynamic range of artistic showmanship on a near cinematic scale and it’s all stitched together by a driving bottom end.
While most European metal acts who dare attempt this level of musicianship, showmanship and attention to detail seem content to toil away in the studio and lock themselves away from the crowds, Avatar have excelled beyond their peers thanks in large part to their continued focus on road work. Careening to and fro on tour busses and airplanes around the world like a marauding troupe of circus performers, Eckerström and his mates (guitarists Jonas Jarlsby and Tim Öhrström, bassist Henrik Sandelin and drummer John Alfredsson) have forged the type of musical bond that can only be brought forth from massive amounts of time spent together on the stage, in hotel rooms, in airports and partying at the venue’s bar.
Whether on tour with bands like In Flames, Dark Tranquility or Helloween, playing gigantic festivals like Storsjöyra and Sweden Rock Festival or demolishing South by Southwest, playing live is what it all comes down to for this band. “That is the final manifestation of our art,” Eckerström insists. “Of course an album is a piece of art in itself, but mainly it's a means to reach the higher goal, which is doing these awesome shows. Touring is of the greatest importance.”
“We all just love the pirate’s life,” he admits freely. “Sailing into the city on this tour bus thingy, going to kick some ass, have that party and all the while meeting all of these people, entertaining them, encountering a culture that's not your own. We love that.”
The want for this type of lifestyle goes back to early childhood fascinations for the good-humored singer. Reading about superheroes, watching Hulk Hogan on TV, getting exposed to Kiss – these were the first ingredients for what Eckerström would go on to create with the guys in Avatar and what has culminated now in Black Waltz.
The frontman promises that Avatar will continue to create, to captivate and to experiment. There’s no definitive endpoint in sight. It’s always about the horizon, the journey itself. “As long as you're hungry as an artist, there are higher and higher artistic achievements. I love AC/DC and Motorhead and what they’ve established is amazing, but we don’t want to write albums that are kind of like the album before. We want to travel to a new galaxy, so to speak, every time.”
The goal is always to conquer what came before. “That is what stays with you as a mentally healthy musician. Or maybe a mentally deranged one, I’m not sure,” the singer laughs. And part and parcel to that continued evolution will be the ever broadening expansion of the scope of Avatar’s worldwide presentation: Black Waltz and beyond.
“We have great visions of what we want to do and the things we want to give to people on a stage,” Eckerström promises. “These ideas, these visions, they require a huge audience. They require a lot of legroom to be done, so I want to get into those arenas, basically. I know we would do something really magical if we got the chance. This idea is one of those things that really, really keeps us going.”

If you're not pissed off, then you're not paying attention. Heavy music is alive and Ded is bringing back the aggressive spirit that is authentic to the genre. "There is an honesty and a "Fuck You" about hard core music that I don't feel as often anymore" says lead singer Joe Cotela. Ded is loud and aggressive - but it serves as a positive outlet: the band produces an unapologetic sound that draws from the art of fantasy and expressive screams.

Ded was born in the music scene of Phoenix, Arizona and has been together for 2 years. Band members Joe Cotela (Vocals), David Ludlow (Guitar), Kyle Koelsch (Bass), and Matt Reinhard (Drums) developed a friendship and ultimately a musical partnership that mixes horror and dark imagery to develop a familiar, yet unique sound that sets them apart from other bands. Cotela says “With our music - we want to make the listener feel like how you feel after you’ve watched a really good horror movie – on edge, jittery… And very much alive”. They incorporate these volatile elements into their lyrics – with the hopes that it will breathe new life into the hard-core genre. Imagine an inspired take on outward thinking that transcends screaming, and low tuned riffs. Their sound is meant to “be in your face and tell it like it is”, while paying homage to Korn and Pantera, who served as early inspirations. Ded are also influenced by more recent bands like Slipknot and Bring Me The Horizon. This is modern hard rock & alternative metal that goes beyond anger - including themes like existentialism and ego in everyday life. The lyrics are timely and resonate with an audience navigating the chaotic world we live in.

The band’s work ethic, drive, and dedication led them to record an EP that quickly made the rounds of the music industry, and started a buzz that opened doors. Using that as a springboard, the band hit the road and toured with Beartooth, Asking Alexandria, Atreyu, Every Time I Die, Upon a Burning Body, The Acacia Strain, John 5, Powerman 5000, and Insane Clown Posse among others.

Their touring helped grow awareness in the business and brought them to the attention of producer John Feldmann (Disturbed, Blink-182, Beartooth). Their collaboration with Feldmann culminated in the band signing with Jordan Schur @ Suretone Records – who discovered and grew the careers of platinum rock acts Staind and Limp Bizkit, among others. Suretone released their first single and video for “FMFY” in December 2016.

2017 has been a busy year for Ded - they have been playing Major Rock festivals and will be touring with KORN this summer. Their 2nd single "Anti-Everything" is Top 20 and climbing @ Active Rock radio and is on standout Hard Rock & Metal playlists at all major streaming services including Spotify, Apple Music, Pandora and Google Play Music. The video for "Anti-Everything" is at almost 1 million views on Youtube. The band is repped by CAA for booking.

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