Yelle

French dance-pop purveyors Yelle have recently returned with their long awaited second album, the exotically addictive Safari Disco Club (out now, V2/Cooperative Music). Adding depth and experience to the sweet & sour pop cocktail found on their acclaimed 2007 debut Pop-Up, Yelle find themselves in a more reflective mood and have learned a few new tricks during their time off. The band have been keeping busy – they covered Robyn's “Who's That Girl” as part of the iTunes international exchange, and she covered their track “A Cause Des Garçons” in return. They were also were asked by Katy Perry to remix her hit single “Hot n Cold” which has led to them supporting her UK tour in the spring of 2011.

Yelle is fronted and named by Yelle, nee Julie Budet, a sparky gamine with a deceptively demure schoolgirl voice. Joined by producers GrandMarnier (Jean-Francois Perrier) and Tepr (Tanguy Destable), Yelle first arrived amid a flurry of 80's inspired pop, with the likes of CSS and New Young Pony Club all revered for their take on brightly colored electro. Pop-Up stood out from the crowd with its wry, frothy and unashamedly fun outlook. This infectious appeal not only led to work with Robyn and Katy Perry, but gained them fans in fellow musicians such as M.I.A. and Mika, fashion designers, Jeremy Scott, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, Brian Lichtenberg or Jean-Paul Lespagnard, a young Belgian designer who designed for Yelle all outfits she’s sporting on her new album visuals as well as mainstream personalities like Perez Hilton, Drew Barrymore or Jessica Alba.

If Pop-Up was a breakout set of fun-loving bawdy pop, Safari Disco Club is it's sharper, wiser sibling. Sonically deeper, multi-layered, and emotionally more diverse,
it defines Yelle's style and elevates them beyond any particular scenes to find a unique pop voice, without singing one iota word in English at that, which speaks volume about her.

Music truly does transcends all. It’s an album that takes us on a captivating journey, with as much ingenuity, beauty and mystery as Pop-Up had sparkle and fun.

MISSION ZERO is frequently asked the same two questions: “Are you guys twins?” and “Where’s the rest of the band?” Creating lush, shiny indie pop that fills a room, siblings Chenot and David Keith (no, they’re not twins) start with powerful, intricate drumming and rich vocals and flesh out their sound with both live and pre-programmed synth and guitar. As WPKN Radio put it,“They sound much bigger than a duo.”

In 2010, lead singer (and guitar and synth player) Chenot was inspired to write an album of solo pop. “I asked my brother to play drums and produce the record,” she says, “and eventually it was clear that we work pretty telepathically as musicians, and we should make this solo project into a real band.” That first album was followed by 2013’s Sky Candy EP, a collaborative effort that blended David’s fresh nonconformity as an arranger with Chenot’s pop sensibility. “The songwriting is basically now 50/50,” said drummer David upon the release of their third album, People in Glass Yachts (May 2015), which credits both brother and sister as writers on every track.

EASY TIGER, Mission Zero's fourth album, moves the siblings' co-songwriting firmly toward pop's future, while keeping one foot dipped in the dreamy pop of the 1980s. Dropping guitar almost completely, the album's sound is much more dependent on synths, and properly showcases the virtuosic drumming of David Keith.

The siblings have played separately and together all over the world in a variety of bands (including David’s current gigs with rock icon Ritchie Blackmore in Rainbow and Blackmore’s Night). Of their musical bond, Chenot explains: “Take two people with shared DNA, add a lifetime of common musical influences and experiences, and you have bandmates who make scarily similar choices in live performance… and the vocal blend of blood relatives is about more than pitch; it’s shared timing and inflection. It’s magical.”

Mission Zero's sound has been compared to the music of Phantogram, tUnE-yArDs, Sylvan Esso, and the Eurythmics, but the band's sound is ever-evolving and truly all its own. Coming from a musical family, the duo has never doubted that music was their path. “We’re happiest up on stage,” says Chenot, “doing what we were always meant to do.”

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