Sarah Shook And The Disarmers

Sarah Shook & The Disarmers is a country band with a sneer, a bite, and no apologies. Shook's original songs take on the usual country spin on shitty relationships, bad decisions, and excessive alcohol consumption for damn good reasons. Songs with self-explanatory self-deprecation, "Fuck Up", tangled in with a portrayal of a doomed relationship dripping with sarcasm,"The Nail", are bastioned by the subtleties of a bar patron considering taking a chance on a stranger in title track, "Sidelong".

When Shook's first band, Sarah Shook & The Devil, broke up after a solid three year plus run, Shook and her guitarist, Eric Peterson, continued to meet, practice, and plan. In late 2013 they put together brief stint called The Dirty Hands which ended after a handful of shows. The project they were looking for soon arrived with the addition of former Two Dollar Pistols' frontman, John Howie Jr., (now frontman for John Howie Jr. & the Rosewood Bluff) as drummer. Sarah Shook & the Disarmers was born.
Shook and chief engineer of Manifold Recording Studios, Ian Schreier, had worked together some years before when he supervised intern Mario Bianchi recording the Devil's seven song EP simply titled, Seven. Shook and Schreier had been discussing creating a full length album together for an age and, finally, during the first weekend of April, 2015, it happened. After nearly a decade of playing solo or fronting a band, Shook released her first full-length album, Sidelong, on October 16, 2015, at the Cat's Cradle Back Room in Chapel Hill, NC.

Ted Z and the Wranglers

Ted Z and the Wranglers, of Southern California, deliver outlaw country-charged rock. Ted's catchy story-songs are fully-realized tales of love, regret, getting older, and getting in trouble. The band stirs up its Americana influences, featuring quick picking and bluesy slide guitar over galloping train beats and swinging shuffles.

Jason Hawk Harris

Jason Hawk Harris experienced his musical coming of age one fateful day in middle school when a friend played him Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody.” Indeed, fate seems writ large in Harris’ artistic journey. He comes from a long line of musicians; a tradition that all but guaranteed a both passionate and vexed relationship with the guitar. Though classically trained, he considers it perhaps the greatest instrument ever created (and occasionally wants to smash his Martin over the head of its inventor). As a young man armed with a healthy prodigality, however, Harris refused to confine his ambitions to six strings. While his peers were trying to learn stick-shift, Harris was writing choral pieces and obsessing over American avant-garde composers like George Crumb. These broader horizons led him to earning a BM in musical composition. But after graduation, the dynastic power of his forebears reasserted its strength, and he returned to his guitar. Still, these days Harris often finds himself casting a wishful eye to the past. He laments the lost opportunity to collaborate with his uncle John Harris, who succumbed to the AIDS virus in 1991. “He wrote sad country songs about heartbreak, love and shame, “Harris says, “and he sang them like it was the last thing he’d ever do.” Taking up his uncle’s mantle, Harris’ songs offer nuanced explorations of life’s vagaries; matching determined honesty with vivid imagination. His upcoming record fuses robust musicianship with a poetic vision inspired by magical realists like Charles Williams and Haruki Murakami. His music, Harris explains, shares in their “audacious assumption that the physical and spiritual occupy the same plane of existence.”

$8.00 - $10.00

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