Motionless In White

Founded in 2005, MOTIONLESS IN WHITE have won over audiences worldwide with their aggressive music and arresting imagery. The band – currently comprising lead singer Chris Motionless, guitarists Ryan Sitkowski and Ricky Horror, bassist Devin "Ghost" Sola, and drummer Vinny Mauro – have proven a ferocious and inventive live act, earning an increasingly fervent fan following via countless headline shows, festival sets, and tours alongside such iconic acts as SLIPKNOT, LAMB OF GOD and A DAY TO REMEMBER, among others.

Every Time I Die

Band Members
Keith Buckley - Vocals
Andrew Williams - Guitar
Jordan Buckley - Guitar
Steve Micciche - Bass Guitar
Daniel Davison - Drums

Born of Osiris

Many religions, cultures, and stories attribute power to the number three. In Egyptian mythology, it symbolizes plurality, and “triads” of deities comprise a complete system. It’s no surprise that the god Osiris was born to one such triad alongside siblings Horus and Isis. It’s also not a coincidence that Chicago heavy metal quintet Born Of Osiris found a similar significance within that number on their fifth full-length album, Soul Sphere [Sumerian Records]. In fact, over the course of 12 tracks, the record examines three tiers originally uncovered in a dream that Joe Buras [clean vocals, synthesizers, keyboards] shared.

“The whole story of the record involves three levels,” explains Joe. “The first one is The Binding. You’re hanging, and you’re stagnant. The second is The Fight. You were hanging, but now you’re pulling away from this linchpin, whether it’s physical, emotional, or spiritual. The final is The Release. You break away and feel free, connected, and loved.”
In order to properly explore the “tiers,” the group—Joe, Ronnie Canizaro [vocals], Cameron Losch [drums], David Da Rocha [bass], and Lee McKinney [guitar]—strengthened their bond exponentially. Since 2007, these five individuals have played countless shows alongside everybody from Judas Priest and Rob Zombie to Bring Me The Horizon and Killswitch Engage in addition to festivals such as Warped Tour, Mayhem Festival, and Music As A Weapon. After each album since their debut landed in the Top 100, including fan favorites A Higher Place [2009] and The Discovery [2011], 2013’s Tomorrow We Die ∆live earned the band their highest Billboard Top 200 debut, reaching #27 and selling over 13,000 copies first-week. After another marathon of touring, the guys headed to Michigan to write what would become Soul Sphere. They then hit the studio with Nick Sampson recording drums and added keys and effects, Lee handling production for guitars and bass, and Allen Hassler for vocals. They managed to click like never before, by drawing on nearly a decade of Born of Osiris.

“Over the years, you get better at creating, writing, and recording in the studio,” says Ronnie. “You improve each time you make an album. Once we had the direction, it started gelling.”
Born Of Osiris preceded the album with the fiery chant of “Throw Me In The Jungle,” showcasing their anthemic side. The follow-up “Resilience” evinced another angle. Its gnashing polyrhythmic guitars collide with orchestral electronics and a forceful and fiery refrain, tapping into the band’s hallmarks while fortifying the attack. “We wanted to use that title for so long,” Joe goes on. “Collectively, we’ve had so much resilience, going through different friendships and changes over the years but still maintaining our connection amongst us.”Then there’s “Illuminate,” which tempers a wall of distortion with a big chorus. The third single “Goddess of the Dawn” snaps from a thick groove punctuated by pinch harmonics before an entrancing clean hook. “We talk about feeling lost, finding yourself, and opening up to love,” says Joe. “It’s all three tiers in one song. As far as the title goes, the Native Americans referred to Aurora Borealis as ‘Goddess of the Dawn’ before they knew what it was. Many cultures and religions would actually worship it.”

Soul Sphere could only by conjured by a group of musicians so personally distinct. Beyond Born Of Osiris, each member continues to enrich his own sphere. In addition to being a partnered Twitch gamer and streamer, Lee is involved in multiple music projects, spanning electronic dance music and progressive rock. His solo guitar project landed in the Top 10 of the Rock Chart alongside System of a Down and Black Sabbath. David runs his own jewelry line D A V I and remains an avid fisherman. Cameron splits his time between drum lessons and composition. Joe oversees and designs the band’s stage production, aesthetic, and lighting, and Ronnie envisions the sweeping sci-fi concepts inside the lyrics and inspiring the artwork. “This group is five best friends together,” adds Ronnie. “We’re all different, and that makes something cool. Not every band has the closeness we do. We’ve all known each other since high school.”

Ultimately, Born Of Osiris relay a crucial message here, together. “I hope people feel creative and want to make their own art after hearing this,” Joe leaves off. “It might get them off their couches and off their phones to really dive into something and challenge themselves.”

Band Members
Ronnie Canizaro- Vocals
Lee Mckinney- Guitar
Joe Buras - Keys
David DaRocha- Bass
Cameron Losch- Drums

Wage War

Briton Bond (Vocals), Cody Quistad (Guitar, Vocals), Seth Blake (Guitar), Chris Gaylord (Bass), Stephen Kluesener (Drums) ­ With over five years of unmatched determination, the culmination of five Florida musicians' effort is ready to be unleashed. Guitarist/vocalist Cody Quistad and guitarist Seth Blake met in high school when they discovered that they shared musical interests, and started jamming soon thereafter. In 2013, the duo encountered vocalist Briton Bond and, shortly after, bassist Chris Gaylord and drummer Stephen Kluesener were incorporated into the mix. The line-up alone of Ocala, Florida's Wage War sheds a more-than-welcome light on the importance of a solid foundation built upon evolving musicianship. Wage War marks their territory with from-the-heart lyrics and thrashing beats that transcend to a community who understands the trials and tribulations of growing up all too well.

In fact, Wage War IS that community, as Quistad explains, "A lot of the themes in our songs are about growing up to be a productive person, and dealing with the real things that can happen in life and coping with circumstances that could be problematic,"says Quested. "The first single we're releasing, 'Alive,' is an anthem to all the naysayers out there that are always talking about our generation being a bunch of losers."

Blueprints, the band's debut album co-produced by A Day To Remember's Jeremy McKinnon along with Andrew Wade, resounds with all of the tension and ingenuity of its creation. The band delivers 11 tracks of uncompromising multi-dimensional metalcore, filled with high-intensity rhythms, battering drums and blazing guitars, tempered with tuneful vocal passages. Crushing breakdowns alongside a combination of roaring and melodic vocals prove powerful enough to level a small village. Yet, Wage War aren't focused solely on destruction.

"The goal of Blueprints was to establish a foundation," Quistad says. "It';s our first record and our first chance to show people what we're about. So we really went all out to deliver the best songs we could possibly write and play them to the best of our ability. I think a lot of people are going to be surprised."

In Humor and Sadness, the debut album from ’68, demonstrates the loud beauty of alarming simplicity. A guy bashing his drums, another dude wielding a guitar like a percussive, blunt weapon while howling into a mic somehow manages to sound bigger and brasher than the computerized bombast of every six-piece metal band. A splash of roots, a soulful yearning for mid century Americana and the fiery passion of post punk ferocity rampages over a record of earnestly forceful tracks like a runaway locomotive.

Josh Scogin wasn’t out of elementary school when the Flat Duo Jets laid their first album down on two tracks in a garage. But the scrappy band’s spirit of raw power, punchy delivery, tried-and-true rhythms and urgent sense of immediacy is alive and well in ’68.

Heralded by Alternative Press as one of 2014’s Most Anticipated Albums, In Humor and Sadness is a snapshot of a fiery new beginning for one of modern Metalcore’s most celebrated frontmen. Produced by longtime Scogin collaborator Matt Goldman (Underoath, Anberlin, The Devil Wears Prada), the first full offering from ’68 is a broad reaching slab of ambitious showmanship delivered with few tools and fewer pretensions. The scratchy disharmonic pop of Nirvana’s Bleach is in there, for sure. And while many associate the setup with The Black Keys, ’68 is more like Black Keys on crack.

“I wanted it to be as loud and obnoxious as it can be,” Scogin explains. “I want it to be in-your-face. I want people who hear us live to just be like, ‘There's no way this is just two dudes!’ That became sort of the subplot to our entire existence. ‘How much noise can two guys make?’ It’s obviously very minimalistic, but in other ways, it’s very big. I have as many amps onstage as a five piece band. Michael only has one cymbal and one tom on his kit, but he plays it like it’s some kind of big ‘80s metal drum setup. It’s minimalistic, but it’s also overkill. We get as much as we can from as little as we can.”

Like many pioneers, North Carolina’s the Flat Duo Jet’s blazed a trail for more commercially successful people. They played rootsy rockabilly but with a punk edge. Band leader Dexter Romweber’s solo work was a fist-pounding celebration of audacity and disruption, which influenced the likes of The White Stripes, among other bands.

“I got excited when I thought about the distress, the chaos that this two-piece arrangement would create – one guy having to provide all of these sounds, with a bunch of pedals, with certain chords wigging out and missing notes here and there,” he says with excitement. “That alone makes up for the chaos of having five people up there.”

That idea of less is more, of building something big from something small, persists today at the top of the charts with The Black Keys, just as it’s lived and breathed in the bass-player-less eclectic trio Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, the rule-breaking early ‘90s destruction of Washington D.C.’s Nation of Ulysses, and in the two man attack of ’68.

“Jon Spencer’s records always sound like he’s kind of winging it and I love that,” declares Scogin, letting out an affectionate laugh. “In my last band, that’s how we tried to make our last record feel. The excitement and imperfection is something I love to draw from.”

Before paring (and pairing) things down with friend and drummer Michael McClellan, Josh Scogin was the voice, founder and agitprop-style provocateur in The Chariot, who laid waste to convention across a brilliantly unhinged and defiantly unpolished catalog of Noisecore triumphs and dissonant art rock rage. Recorded live in the studio, overdub free, The Chariot’s first album set the tone for a decade to come, owing more to a band like Unsane than whatever passes for “scene.”

Scogin was the original singer for Norma Jean and left an influential imprint on the burgeoning Metalcore of the late 90s that persists today, despite having fronted the band for just one of six albums. Whether it’s the genre-defining heft of Norma Jean’s first album or the five records and stage destroying shows of The Chariot, there’s a single constant at the heart of Josh Scogin’s career: a familiarity with the unfamiliar.

A new Metalcore band would be a safe third act for the subculture lifer, but Scogin isn’t comfortable unless he’s making himself (and his audience) uncomfortable. “I definitely wanted to flip the script a bit,” he freely confesses. “I’ve always wanted to play guitar and sing in a band, ever since I left Norma Jean. I needed the freedom of not having a guitar onstage, but now having done that for several years, I wanted the challenge.”

Creative problem solving has long been the name of the game for Scogin, whether he was hand stamping ALL 30,000 CDs for The Chariot’s Wars and Rumors of Wars album or figuring out how to pull off his ’68 song title concept in the digital age of iTunes. Each song on In Humor and Sadness was to be titled with simply a single letter, which when put together vertically on the back of a vinyl LP or compact disc, would spell out a word. However, it's problematic to name more than one song with the same letter, which would have been necessary to spell out what he intended.

’68 is the forward thinking progress of an artist who finds satisfaction in the expression of dissatisfaction. There’s progression in this regression. Tear apart all of the elements that have enveloped a singer’s performance, strap a guitar on the guy and set him loose with nothing but a beat behind him? It’s a recipe for inventive, fanciful mayhem.

After a raucous debut at South By Southwest, a full US tour supporting Chiodos and many more road gigs on the horizon, Scogin and McClellan are propelled by the excitement that comes along with the knowledge that ‘68 is truly just getting started.

“We’ve just broken the tip of the iceberg. We’re really just exploring all the different things we can do,” Scogin promises. “I’ll get more pedals, we’re try different auxiliary instruments, whatever – the goal is to challenge ourselves and challenge an audience.”

Out Came The Wolves

Band Members
Members:
Cameron Burns - Vocals
Austin Brady - Guitar
George Shrouder - Guitar
Ervin Buljubasic - Bass
Andy Hart - Drums

$27.50 - $30.00

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