Love  - Trumps - Hate: A Benefit for The ACLU and Planned Parenthood

Love - Trumps - Hate: A Benefit for The ACLU and Planned Parenthood

The LA Safety Coalition & The Bootleg Theater are excited to announce Love - Trumps - Hate: A Benefit for The ACLU and Planned Parenthood taking place January 14th, 2017 at the Bootleg Theater.

Music is a real voice in our country and we are planning to celebrate our freedom and express our disapproval of the incoming administration taking office in 2017. This is why Ralph Torrefranca (A&R at Angry Mob Music Publishing) teamed up with Kyle Wilkerson (Talent Buyer of The Bootleg Theater) to put together a special benefit show called "Love -Trumps - Hate" which will feature an array of passionate musicians who will come together on January 14th 2017 to help raise money and build an awareness for The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and Planned Parenthood.

The night will feature performances from: Silversun Pickups (full band acoustic set) YACHT, James Supercave, Nick Waterhouse (special 4 piece set), Bloodboy, Expo 86 & a DJ set from Grant Owens (of WFNM).


There will also be a special silent auction available only at the event featuring tickets and limited edition signed items from: Fitz & The Tantrums, Leon Bridges, Young The Giant, Family of The Year, Mac DeMarco, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Angel Olsen, Børns, YACHT, Run River North, How to Dress Well, Counting Crows & a raffle for a gift card courtesy of our friends at Amoeba Music.

L-T-H is honored to have the support of the following co-presenters and organizations: Amoeba Music, Swinghouse, Buzzbands.LA, We Found New Music, Balcony TV LA, Everett, LKYA, B3SCI and Angry Mob Music.

Tickets will be $20 online/at the door, the event starts at 7:30pm on January 14th.

Silversun Pickups (Full Band Acoustic Set)

"This album is like its own quantum universe," says Silversun Pickups singer/guitarist Brian Aubert. "It's kind of unstable."

Silversun Pickups' first new album in more than three years, BETTER NATURE sees the Silverlake, CA-based band partnering once again with producer Jacknife Lee (U2, Two Door Cinema Club, Crystal Castles), with whom they so successfully collaborated on 2012's visionary NECK OF THE WOODS. Songs like "Friendly Fires" and "Cradle (Better Nature)" were created and crafted in Lee's Topanga studio, the band building out organically from Aubert's spare songwriting demos. The result is fluid and freewheeling, "oozy," in Aubert's words, with heavily cranked guitars, propulsive rhythms, and seemingly infinite textures.

GRAMMY® Award-winning mix engineer Alan Moulder (My Bloody Valentine, Nine Inch Nails, Royal Blood) brings maximum sonic power to the proceedings, but at the album's beating heart is Silversun Pickups' remarkably intuitive interplay, as ever providing panoramic musical counterpoint to Aubert's incisive, increasingly self-exploratory lyricism. Richer, warmer, and more evocative than anything in their prior canon, BETTER NATURE is Silversun Pickups' most human music thus far.

"I'll tell you something that makes me a little nervous," Aubert confides. "This record, I like it. Usually I'm like, well, we tried! But this one, it's weird – we're all digging on it."

Silversun Pickups is among the most dynamic and creative rock bands of the modern era, hailed far and wide for their inimitable merging of ethereal melodies and pure sonic force. From the indie rock opening salvo of 2005's PIKUL EP to 2012's far-reaching NECK OF THE WOODS, each successive release has seen the Silverlake, CA-based band boldly venture into uncharted terrain, bravely pushing their imagination and ability towards new and surprising summits. BETTER NATURE marks the debut release from Silversun Pickups' own New Machine Recordings. The label – which takes its name from the PIKUL favorite, "…All The Go Inbetweens" – allows the ever-autonomous band to fully determine its own course without any interference from on high.

"This record is as indie as it gets," Aubert laughs. "Maybe we're crazy, but at the end of the day, it's really not that different than before except we have more control."

Silversun Pickups' first decision as label heads was to once again record with producer Jacknife Lee at his nearby Topanga studio, enabling all involved to stay close to home throughout the process.

"People always say, why don't you guys go make a record out of town somewhere," Aubert says, "but then when would we ever live here? This is my only chance to hang in Los Angeles. If I'm not here now, when am I ever going to see these people? We learned early on – we didn't pay attention to our home life and came back from the road to some very broken and tattered universes. We said, right there and then, we have to figure this out, how to do this and still be people. Which is something we eventually did."

Aubert also notes that first time collaborations are always more tentative and introductory, the second go-around allowing the participants to get looser and more inventive. Having already established a creative relationship with NECK OF THE WOODS, Silversun Pickups and Lee were not only comfortable together, they knew what worked.

"It just moves in a way that's so quick and easy," Aubert says. "You have the same discussions and the same battles, but you're friendly, you're closer than you were before. You don't have to explain everything, because they know."

Aubert began writing new songs upon Silversun Pickups' return to California after nearly two years on the road. He prepared for the new album by recording a series of extremely stripped down demos with keyboardist Joe Lester in the band's rehearsal room, mostly wordless, others just hints of melody and sound. Silversun Pickups took those "raw bones" and "used the studio to be creative," Aubert says, "to be improvisational. To not be too locked down." With only the barest hint of a blueprint, the band relied on their already in-sync interactivity in order to create something fully attributable to all members.

"There's a sound that we have that only happens when the four of us get together," Aubert says. "We can push further and further and further because we know that at the end of the day, that's not going to change. It's going to be me and it's going to be them. There's a certain thing that's immovable whether we like it or not."

Where NECK OF THE WOODS was "purposely nostalgic," BETTER NATURE was designed as a snapshot of Silversun Pickups smack dab at this particular moment in time.

"This all felt very current," Aubert says. "Very right now. Everything is super-happening. We've been doing this awhile now and this time I wanted us to really enjoy the process, to just laugh about it, to really feel…oozy. I just wanted it to come out, without thinking about it. I just wanted to exist."

Silversun Pickups maintained a similarly Zen approach to the sessions themselves. The band had heretofore rehearsed new songs to perfection before getting near the studio, allaying their own jitters by locking everything into muscle memory before the record button was pushed. This time, that sort of safety net was off the table.

"We never played these songs straight through, all together," Aubert says, "but it's even more organic in a way, because we were all creating it together. How these songs come to be is in our hands. We have the bone, how do we put some meat on this thing?"

The sessions were unstructured by design, which isn't to say the band didn't apply considerable forethought to the process. Aubert cites influences on the album spanning Sparklehorse to NPR's much beloved Radiolab, the band's goal up front to create "a non-existent thing that sounds like it really exists."

"We wanted it to be big and bombastic," Aubert says. "We wanted there to be weird moments – Double time! Bar chords! Screaming! Monkey sounds! The guitars were going to be swelling again, there were going to be loud solos. Things needed to be coming at you."

The band worked fast despite the lack of prep, spending a grand total of 30 days recording the album between October 2014 and the start of the New Year, banging out finished track after finished track in short, sharp sessions.

"It was weird," Aubert says. "it was as intense to make as all the others, but it was also very focused. I think we've learned over the years how much time we waste. Back in the day we didn't care, but now we're all like, let's go in, do five solid hours, and go home. We want to live. We need to do this one thousand percent, but not only this. We don't want to be completely absorbed by this."

A vibrantly creative groove was established in which "no one knew who was going to be doing what at any time." Instruments were set up and ready to go at all times, Aubert even tracked vocals sans headphones, using a multi-directional microphone to "just sing to the room."

"As tight as the last one was," Aubert says, "this one needed to be loose."

BETTER NATURE is indeed Silversun Pickups at their most supple; "Pins and Needles" is all loping riff and kinetic beats while "Friendly Fires" slow jams as much as it slow burns. Co-written and sung by Monninger, "Circadian Rhythms (Let's Dance)" is audaciously imagined modern pop, "the kind of song we would have tried to steer away from in the past," Aubert says. "We had to be reminded that that was what we were going for, that we weren't afraid of anything."

A number of roads are first taken on BETTER NATURE, the band allowing themselves to tackle tunes that once would have been anathema to the Silversun aesthetic. "Nightlight," the album's incandescent first single, is lifted aloft by a sing-along chorus unprecedented in the band's undoubtedly hook-heavy canon.

"I remember thinking, we should not do this," Aubert says, "But then I thought, why not? Let's do it, who cares?"

The band's openness informed every move, from incorporating elements from Aubert and Lester's very lo-fi demos to switching out tried and true instrumentation with invention and remarkable spontaneity. Silversun Pickups went with the flow at all turns, letting songs shift and take new shapes as events warranted. Recording "Tapedeck" proved as much "a wild ride" as the relentlessly veering song itself.

"We were working that one and that same day, Jacknife bought a vibraphone," Aubert says. "We said, Nikki, why don't you learn to play it? We've never done that before. So Nikki goes off for an hour or two and next thing you know, she's playing the vibraphone. Those are the moments that were never available to us before because of our own closed-in mindset, we would never have taken those opportunities before."

Harmonious and intimate, high-flying and deeply personal, BETTER NATURE is a revelatory manifestation of a great band entirely in touch with the muse and each other. Silversun Pickups have once again managed the tricky task of being completely contemporary while also full on forward thinking, now as ever, existing more than a few steps ahead of the curve.

"The people who are invested in us generally like the last record we made every time we put out a new one," Aubert says. "PIKUL was this really low budget EP and then with CARNAVAS, everyone was like, 'whoa, this is sharp!' SWOON came out and it was all dreamy so people went 'well, this is no CARNAVAS.' And then with NECK OF THE WOODS, it was, 'this is nothing like SWOON.' We can't wait to put this record out so people can tell us how much they liked the last one."

YACHT are artists based in Los Angeles.

YACHT’s figureheads, Jona Bechtolt and Claire L. Evans, are opposing forces. It’d be generous to call Jona a high school dropout: he never attended a single day, choosing instead to literally “bang on the drum all day” as an outpatient in the teenage art ward. Claire was born in England, raised in France, and moved to Oregon to be watched after by the Intel corporation in the mid-1990s, during the height of the microprocessor boom. But the unlikely pairing is the source of their power.

YACHT’s new album, I Thought The Future Would Be Cooler, is a sweeping and visionary critique of the 21st century. It reveals the band at its most self-assured: critical, funny, tough, and musically diverse, crafting an infectious and hyperactive conceptual pop that seems to seep through the walls of an alternate universe. YACHT’s knowing references to technology, feminism, and media are layered in complex arrangements in songs about holograms and phones, police violence and identity, sex and the future.

This is the first YACHT album that Bechtolt and Evans didn’t create in a vacuum. Starting from the ground up, the pair wrote the album with their longtime collaborator and bandmate Rob Kieswetter, who also produced the album with Bechtolt (a first: Bechtolt has been YACHT’s sole producer since 2002). The result is a surprising and heterogeneous collection of songs that only YACHT could make. Grammy-winning Irish producer Jacknife Lee (REM, Bloc Party, Robbie Williams, Taylor Swift) stepped in as a hypercolor shaman of sorts, creating his own album-wide credit of “objective overseer and structural mechanic.” The album’s title track was co-produced with Justin Meldal-Johnsen (Beck, M83, Tegan and Sara) and its string arrangement was put together by pop polymath Jherek Bischoff (David Byrne, Caetano Veloso, Parenthetical Girls). The album was recorded over two years in Los Angeles at a handful of studios (Jacknife’s technicolor compound in Topanga Canyon, Meldal-Johnsen’s studio in Atwater Village, Red Bull’s studio in Santa Monica, and YACHT’s home studio) as well as in a former cavalry bunker in Marfa, Texas, at the Marfa Recording Company.

I Thought The Future Would Be Cooler draws from a weird well of ADD influences: 80s Japanese electronic reggae (Sandii & The Sunsetz, Haruomi Hosono), 70s and 80s post-punk and no wave (Family Fodder, The Waitresses, Suburban Lawns, Killing Joke, A Certain Ratio, Devo), Norwegian disco (Todd Terje, Lindstrøm, Prins Thomas), Grand Royal Records-era alternative music (Cibbo Matto, Luscious Jackson, Money Mark).

YACHT was first created in 2002, as a design studio operating under the acronym “Young Americans Challenging High Technology.” As technology became more evenly distributed, YACHT transformed into a word representing everything Jona and Claire touch, each medium informing the next. More traditional artists tend to compartmentalize their efforts, but like an adolescent trying on identities, from 2002-2015 YACHT have shapeshifted: from solo laptop performer to wacked-out performance artists, from harsh electronic comedians to composers, from a two-piece avant-garde karaoke group to a four-piece a no-wave broken disco band, all while working as commissioned artists, writers, editors, and speakers for organizations like TEDx, WIRED, MoMA, Rhizome, VICE, and more. The common thread: Claire and Jona’s distinct amalgamation of cynicism, optimism, and attention to the special details that keep their work interesting and idiosyncratic.

If you’re confused by YACHT, either look closer or zoom out. There’s a decade-plus of work to sift through: joke websites, videos somehow seen by millions, subversive design projects, texts, one-time-only events, and more live shows around the world than should be counted at this point.

Just the facts:

-YACHT lives in and champions the city of Los Angeles, California

-YACHT’s new album is called I Thought The Future Would Be Cooler

-I Thought The Future Would Be Cooler was produced by Jona Bechtolt & Rob Kieswetter

-YACHT signed to Downtown Records in late 2014

-YACHT’s last two critically-acclaimed LPs were released by seminal New York City label, DFA Records

-YACHT’s first three albums were released on micro-labels (Marriage and States Rights Records) based in the Pacific Northwest. These same labels also cultivated artists like Dirty Projectors, Jib Kidder, Lucky Dragons, White Rainbow, and more YACHT’s core members are Jona Bechtolt (pronounced John-uh Beck-tolt) and Claire L. Evans. Rob Kieswetter has been a close collaborator since YACHT’s inception, and Jeffrey Brodsky joined in 2010

-YACHT have created and sold unplayable compact discs, published a philosophical handbook, designed a sunglasses collection, created a fragrance, campaigned against NSA surveillance, and given presentations about their work in art museums, tech conferences, and rock clubs

-Claire is a writer. She works for VICE, editing science fiction stories and publishing editorials about science, technology, and feminism. Claire and Jona are the co-founders of an app called 5 Every Day that is also a segment on the largest NPR station in California, KPCC. Claire gives presentations at places like the Walker Art Center, Moogfest, TEDx, and UCLA

Nick Waterhouse

Nick Waterhouse's art springs from a simple idea: everybody wants to be somebody else. One of his heroes, Van Morrison, got his start covering Bobby Bland, whose own musical idol was Nat "King" Cole. In Waterhouse's view, emulation is a journey; you never truly succeed, but as the singer, guitarist and songwriter puts it, "You become something on the way there."

Nick was born in 1986 and grew up in Huntington Beach, a place known predominantly for its tanning salons, commercial surf culture, and UFC fighters. In his early teens, he established his musical sensibilities in the midst of the burgeoning Southern California DIY scene (Burger Records, Ty Segall, McHugh's Distillery studio), through which he refined his own idiosyncratic perspective on the spirit of American Rhythm & Blues and Rock & Roll.

Waterhouse started performing as a teenager. "It was really motivated by fear," he recalls. "I'm kind of an introvert, so it was an uncomfortable situation. It was a way to force a crisis." The young artist experienced an exhilaration he'd never felt before, and hasn't found anywhere else since. "It's a feeling of heightened awareness that goes beyond pleasure," Waterhouse explains. "It has something to do with seeing ahead in time and behind in time all at once. You don't just get the immediate reward; you get the potential that rewards you the same way."

Waterhouse explored the idea of potential on his breakthrough single, "Some Place," a beautifully lean, propulsive track recorded at all-analog studio the Distillery and self-released in 2010 on his own Pres label. "Well, there's someplace that I'd rather be," Waterhouse sang in a fierce yet plaintive register. "And it's something that's been on my mind almost constantly."

These days, Waterhouse is a successful recording artist, with one well-received LP and and several high-profile tours and collaborations to his name. But his latest work still embodies the struggle of his early forays. During "This Is a Game," Waterhouse sets up a snarly, post-surf guitar solo with a succinct statement of a cynical outlook: "This is a game / Please remember my words / And don't get upset when you don't get what you think you deserve." And on the gothic-soul strut "Let It Come Down," he meditates on the inevitability of pain. "If there's gonna be rain tonight," he sings in a stoic croon. "Let it come down."

It's clear from this material that Waterhouse is in the midst of his own becoming. He isn't the type to let ecstasy take over, like Van Morrison, or to drawl away in a consummately laid-back register, like Mose Allison. In the tension between his wry lyrics and crisp arrangements, you hear the expression of a worldly skeptic who's also—when it comes to his art—a sanctified believer. Whoever it was that Nick Waterhouse wanted to be matters less now; these days, he just sounds like himself.

James Supercave

Opaque in an age of Internet transparency, James Supercave's approach to pop stardom is a bit less visible and a little more strange.

Beyond the fragmentary web presence, the pixel personality, the blogger hearsay-to know James Supercave is to listen to the music. Supercave assumes the pop idiom, filling its dimensions (drums, synth, guitar, bass, vocals) while continually charting its fringes. The result: modern eccentricities thrown Pollock-like against psych pop-a sound that is cerebral in lyric and muscular in command of beat and groove.

Whether in winking jabs at corporations, or in frustration anthems angled at the internet native, James Supercave offers an uncompromising mirror to life's edges: the smooth, the rough-hewn, the odd-angled. James Supercave, the pixelated face of many, offers urgency to preserve the human in it all.

After sharing stages with Future Islands, Warpaint, Chet Faker, and Jungle, James Supercave partnered with Fairfax Recordings for their debut LP, Better Strange. Supercave is currently on tour, with the album set to release in February 2016.

$20.00

Sold Out

2 ticket limit per customer. Orders exceeding the ticket limit are subject to cancellation. ** No exchanges or name changes. No exceptions **

Who’s Going

300

Upcoming Events
Bootleg Theater