True Widow

Dallas trio TRUE WIDOW craft patient, rounded music that calls to mind images of
foggy dawns and parched fields. Formed in November 2007, TRUE WIDOW released
their self-titled debut a year later and immediately caught the ears of the underground. At its core, the music of TRUE WIDOW is powered by the driving, guitar-dense aspects of shoegaze and stoner rock and the heavy, low-moving evocations of ambient music.
Following their auspicious start, the band returned in 2011 with their sophomore full length, As High As The Highest Heavens And From The Center To The Circumference Of The Earth. As High As The Highest Heavens saw the band solidify their direction and further mature their sound, but it wasn’t until 2013’s Circumambulation (TRUE WIDOW’s debut album for independent label Relapse Records) that they reached the heights - both professionally and compositionally - they have now. Circumambulation garnered the band widespread praise both within and beyond the metal world and was praised by publications as diverse as Pitchfork, NPR, Decibel Magazine, and Metal Injection. The band followed up the success of that album with extensive touring across the US, Russia, and Europe, including numerous appearances at renowned festivals such as Roadburn, Fun Fun Fun Fest, Psycho California, and more.
This year, Avvolgere, the forthcoming LP from Texas trio TRUE WIDOW, perfects the
formula that Circumambulation established. The album rocks and rolls with serene, rounded climaxes and steep, jangling choruses that engulf the listener with waves of downbeat, saccharine melodies and mesmerizing distortion. TRUE WIDOW’s signature alternation between male and female vocals helps further blur the boundaries between the heft of stoner rock, the droning atmosphere of shoegaze, and the twangy catchiness of blues and indie rock. It’s both concise and circuitous - the album takes you on a journey that you can’t ever quite predict or expect. Avvolgere is TRUE WIDOW sounding more infectious and consummate than ever before.
True Widow is:
D.H. Phillips (guitar/steel guitar/vocals)
Nicole Estill (bass/acoustic guitar/vocals)
Slim TX (drums/piano)

Mary Lattimore

Throughout her collections of improvisations, Mary Lattimore translates memory into music using her 47-string Lyon & Healy harp.

Lattimore started learning the harp at age 11. "The harp is an instrument that reveals more mystery and potential the more you get to know it," she explains. "You're sort of hugging it when you play it, so it's very intimate and personal. The vibrations are right there up close to your heart, physically."

Collaborations with musicians including Kurt Vile, Meg Baird, and Thurston Moore, helped hone her ear and develop a part-writing style. In 2014, she released a collaborative album in with synth player and producer Jeff Zeigler on Thrill Jockey and played with Fursaxa and cellist Helena Espvall, whose "otherworldly concoctions" of loops and layers proved a formative influence.

In 2014 Lattimore received a prestigious fellowship from the Pew Center for Arts & Heritage — a rare honor given to 12 people every year — and used the funds to take a road trip across America with a friend, writing and recording songs at each stop along the way. With her harp and laptop, Lattimore drew inspiration from each location, letting the environments in which she recorded color her work. The result is evocative, delicate and haunting music, Lattimore's harp at times bright and skipping, other times distant and hazy, swathed in gauzy delay.

She recorded much of At the Dam in the beautiful setting of Joshua Tree. "I would wheel the harp out on to the porch of my friend Chiara's little house and I had the whole desert around me. It felt like a residency on another planet." Lattimore also recorded in Marfa, Texas at a friends home, as well as in the mountains of Altadena, east of LA.

Recording far away from her Philadelphia home gave Lattimore space to navigate her thoughts. The stirring, slightly ominous opener "Otis Walks Into the Woods" attempts to encapsulate her reaction to the news that her family's blind dog had walked into the forest on the outskirts of their farm to pass away – a gently hypnotic ode to a noble companion. "Jimmy V" recalls another fallen hero, basketball coach Jimmy Valvano. "Before taking the road trip, I'd seen a great documentary on him, a really interesting and complex, inspiring character, and thought I'd write a song with him in mind," Mary says, "Maybe it's the first harp song written about a basketball coach?" On "Jaxine Drive," a guitar sighs, low and sorrowful beneath Lattimore's hopeful-sounding harp, while "Ferris Wheel, January" imagines one looking at the Pacific Ocean from high elevation and the patterns of the waves creating an illusion resembling the bright lights of the Santa Monica Pier in winter. It's a travel diary," explains Lattimore, "A chunk of my life that I attempted to wrangle into a recorded language that feels familiar but not too precious."

At The Dam is named for a Joan Didion essay about the Hoover Dam: "its enchanting, grandiose practicality, how it will keep operating in its own solitude, even when humans aren't around." Drawing inspiration from these ideas and treating each memory thoughtfully and sensitively, Lattimore captures transient moments as time moves inexorably forward.

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