X performs Wild Gift

Three decades after the inception of X, one thing is clear: X was not only one of the most influential bands to crash out of the punk movement of the late ‘70s, but the band’s music continues to be sonically groundbreaking today. Songs written during the group’s inception are as relevant and inventive today as they were in 1977. The fact is, no one sounds like X and no one ever will.

It’s not surprising when you consider the group’s unique beginnings, which can only be attributed to fate. On the same day with nearly the exact same wording, two want-ads appear in a local music rag. One was sent in by a guitarist named Billy Zoom, the other by bassist who called himself John Doe.

Zoom, a rockabilly rebel who’d performed with Gene Vincent, had read a negative review of a band called the Ramones. It said they only played three chords and they played ‘em too fast. So naturally, he went to see them. The show was at the Golden West Ballroom in the L.A. suburb of Norwalk in early ’77, and as soon as the Ramones started to perform, Zoom realized that, musically, he’d found exactly what he wanted to do with his life.

Doe, who was originally from the Baltimore area, was already down with the East Coast CBGB’s scene and by the time the two got in the same room together after responding to each other’s ads, it seemed it was meant to be. They performed a few shows with various drummers before a poet with no ambition of being a singer would enter the picture.

Doe found her in Venice Beach, at a poetry reading. He liked her poems so much he offered to perform them in his band. The poet, Exene Cervenka, had just moved to town from Florida and she told him, no offense, but if anyone was gonna perform her poems, it would be her, and she soon ended up in the band. Zoom was skeptical about someone’s girlfriend being in the band. After they did their first show with Exene, he didn’t know exactly what it was she had, but he knew it was magic. After a succession of drummers, Doe was at the underground punk club the Masque in

Hollywood one night, checking out a band called the Eyes, which featured a pre-Go- Go’s bass player named Charlotte Caffey. He called Zoom immediately and said he’d found their drummer. Doe told him he played with a parade snare and hit it hard as a hammer. Zoom told him to promise him anything. His name was D.J. Bonebrake and he quickly signed on. The band was now complete, and X would soon emerge from the young punk scene as one of its most successful offspring.

The band’s early albums, Los Angeles (1980), produced by Ray Manzarek of the Doors, Wild Gift (1981), and Under the Big Black Sun (1982) explored dark love and an even darker L.A. with the unflinching eye of a Raymond Chandler novel. Doe and Cervenka would marry and later divorce, but they’d always remain soulmates. As they released each ensuing album, More Fun in theNew World(1983) and Ain’t Love Grand (1985), the band continued to grow sonically and politically, fearlessly mixing genres without ever losing its center. As each member went on to explore diverse careers—careers that included acting, art, writing, producing and multiple side projects.”

Timmy's Organism

Fronting some of the most original, compelling and unpredictable bands (not only in Detroit, but the world) for over two decades, Tim Lampinen's work with the Epileptix, Clone Defects, and Human Eye has always held a rapturous cult following. Yet his work with his current trio, Timmy's Organism, presents Lampinen (aka Timmy Vulgar) along with bassist Jeff Giant and drummer Blake Hill, ready for their close-up. With Heartless Heathen the group touches on their artistic and spiritual forbears of Captain Beefheart and Destroy All Monsters, while amply ramping up the slop culture rapture of classic punk 'n' roll like Chrome, Crime, and the Damned as well as contemporaries like Thee Oh Sees. There's a reason why Lampinen won a $25,000 Kresge Grant for his work with his bands...he creates music that borders on art, live shows that border on theater. It's high time the rest of the world takes notice. Are you ready?

Timmy Vulgar, Detroit's favorite son, and most ambitiously amphibious creative force doesn't need much of an introduction to anyone familiar with subversive punk music over the past decade and a half. He's been such an irreplaceable figure in each of his musical endeavors since his emergence in such legendary acts such as the Epilieptix and Clone Defects back in the late 1990s, right up through his shape-shifting efforts in the mollusk-like Human Eye and the prog-soaked Reptile Forcefield, and straight into his latest nerve-numbing scatterbomb known simply as Timmy's Organism. (Todd Killings, Hozac Records)

For Timmy's Organism, Timmy Vulgar wrangles up a trio of like-minded degenerates and leads them through dismantled punk, space-blues, and debris-sodden noise with deft ease. (Larry Hardy, In the Red Records)

How can KURT VILE fans sleep at night knowing that this fucking guy is out there, ruling the universe? Seriously, Timmy Vulgar - punko-futuro from EPILEPTIX, CLONE DEFECTS and HUMAN EYE - makes everyone else look like a fucking joke. (Mitch Cardwell, Maximum Rock'n'Roll)

Timmy's Organism is the next logical step in a family of Michigan noise that includes the now defunct Piranhas as well as Tentacle Lizardo, The Frustrations, Reptile Forcefield and even Tyvek. More stripped down and raw than anything Human Eye has done to date but no less intense. (Maurice Moore, Chicago Evensi)

Dead Rock West

Led by vocalist Cindy Wasserman and singer / guitarist Frank Lee Drennen, Dead Rock West specializes in a jangly west coast alt country that shades into pop and punk territory at times, like a clever cross between the Gram Parsons version of The Byrds and L.A.'s X. Recorded live to tape at EastWest Studios' fabled Studio 1 in Los Angeles, the band's lauded Everly Brothers tribute album "It's Everly Time!" goes beyond a simple ode to the
pioneering rock artists by recasting the siblings' songs for a new generation.

$35.00 - $40.00

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