Weaves is a guerrilla project, intentionally forcing each member to create outside of the tiresome redundancy of a four-piece band. Reluctant to hide behind a wall of reverb or instantly affiliate with a scene, they are focused on mirroring pop sensibilities while evoking a visual and vulgarized experience.

Jasmyn Burke and Morgan Waters were sick of making music. Burke had just moved on from her long-time project RatTail but didn't know if she should continue, or how. Waters had seen his fair share of the poppier side of the Canadian music industry but was disillusioned and longing for more grit. The two were reinvigorated after a chance meeting and the exchange of some preliminary cellphone demos. The tension between Burke's affinity for topsy-turvy tunes and Waters' ear for buoyant pop hooks meant that their resulting songs could totally revel in fun, arty, noisy weirdness yet still maintain a level of accessibility. Rhythm section Spencer Cole and Zach Bines have since joined to help fill out Weaves' freaky, three-dimensional songs in the studio as well as onstage.

Tennis System

The promise of L.A. may well lie in Tennis System, who have thundered their way through their adopted city with a reverb-drenched ferocity that has, in short order, made the East Coast transplants the city’s band to watch.


One listen is all it takes to comprehend why: Tennis System are masters of unhinged, lo-fi psychedelia, laced with the inescapably pop DNA of Jesus and Mary Chain, Nirvana and Ride. Behind the sweat-drenched performances, behind the Orange amps and squalling anthems is a coolly leather-clad trio, composed of front man Matty Taylor, drummer Hector Gomez, and bassist Zach Bilson. Arriving at the current lineup, however, was spirit quest that took Tennis System from one coast to the other: It was in gritty Washington, D.C. that a young Taylor steeped like tea in the music of Fugazi and Bad Brains, Black Tambourine and Nation of Ulysses. He decamped for Los Angeles, where denizens Gomez and Bilson joined the band, propelling the band forward as a full-fledged L.A. band.


Though Tennis System has shared bills with the likes of Ty Segall, Wavves, Japandroids, Pains of Being Pure at Heart, Mark Gardner and Beach Fossils, and worked with Jeff Zeigler of Uniform Recording (Kurt Vile, War on Drugs, Nothing) and Fred Kevorkian (White Stripes, Pavement, Sonic Youth, the National) since its founding in 2009, life on the best coast has only served to raise its profile: In the past year, crowds at Filter Magazine’s Culture Collide festival, Austin Psych Fest, L.A.’s iconic Part-Time Punks showcase and South by Southwest have begun to bear witness to Tennis System’s slash-and-burn live shows.


After 2011’s much blogged-about self-released album, “Teenagers” (and its stunner of a single, “Hey We Tried”), the band returns in the fall of 2014 with “Technicolour Blind,” the appropriately named, heady fever-dream of a new album that has been a year in the making for Tennis System. Its tracks, including “Technicolour Blind” “Memories & Broken Dreams” and the sparkling, anthemic “Dead Honey” are melodic departures from the gritty, fuzz-washed tunes of yore; rather, Los Angeles life, with its thrilling beauty and starkly menacing underbelly, has left Tennis System sun-bleached and wary, and left their music imbued with the peculiar patina of a rough-and-tumble circumstance. The guitars still squeal, but listen closely: Taylor’s lyricism bears unexpected wisdom and woe. Recorded with Ulysses Noriega (The Wedding Present, Ben Folds, The Offspring) mixed by Drew Fisher (The Melvins, Bleached, Babies) and mastered by John Greenham (Ice Cube, Aesop Rock, Chuck Prophet), “Technicolour Blind” is poised to be Tennis System’s breakout effort, even if fans knew it all along.

French Vanilla

rench Vanilla is an art-punk band based in Los Angeles that regulates the dance floor with punchy bass lines, catchy sax hooks and socially engaged lyrics. They began partially driven by a desire to challenge the established SoCal music scene, dominated by a few influential (male) tastemakers, and they continue to be motivated by connecting with like-minded audiences. Originating in LA’s queer punk underground, they have become a favorite of many of LA’s prominent indie musicians, completing tours with Wavves, Joyce Manor, Girlpool and Surf Curse. The band's ideology assumes the generative nature of women’s and/or BFF’s collaboration, a message they want to spread until dude-rock ceases to be the norm. More than anything, FV wants you to have fun at their shows and they deliver impassioned performances with infectious energy and enthusiasm. ​

$8.00 - $9.50

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