The Expendables

The Expendables enjoyed a laid-back lifestyle growing up in Santa Cruz, CA; surfing, skating, partying, and playing music were commonplace. Since 1997, The Expendables have staked their claim in the California surf/rock genre by headlining venues from coast to coast. Blending Reggae, Punk Rock, and 80s style dueling guitar solos, The Expendables have made heads turn and floors shake for years.
The band consists of four longtime friends: Geoff Weers (Guitar and Vocals), Adam Patterson (Drums and Vocals), Raul Bianchi (Lead Guitar) and Ryan DeMars (Bass). The first seven years of their career was fueled with three full-length, completely independent releases. No Time To Worry (2000), Open Container (2001), and Gettin’ Filthy (2004), would bring in a combined total of over 40,000 units sold with no physical distribution and no record label.
While touring and supporting their album, Gettin’ Filthy, The Expendables would share the stage with Slightly Stoopid and catch the attention of founders and front men Kyle McDonald and Miles Doughty. In 2007 Slightly Stoopid formed their own independent label, Stoopid Records, and signed The Expendables for the label’s first non-Stoopid release, which was The Expendables self-titled. Released in September 2007, the album would be accepted as an instant classic by fans and received rave reviews from critics.
The band continued supporting the album with hundreds of shows over the next two years, gaining fans around the world, and respect from the bands that influenced them. The band would share the stage with bands like Slightly Stoopid, NoFX, Less Than Jake, Pennywise and Pepper to name a few. At the end of 2009 and beginning of 2010 the band would work on their next album Prove It produced by Paul Leary (producer of Sublime, Slightly Stoopid, Pepper, Supersuckers, as well as the guitar player for Butthole Surfers) and El Hefe (guitar player for NoFX).
Prove It was released May 11th 2010 debuting at #158 on the Billboard Top 200, #30 on Billboard’s Independent charts, and #4 on Billboard’s Heatseekers! The album also pushed to #15 on iTunes Top 200 and #5 on iTunes Alternative Charts, jumping The Expendables to a new level in their career. The band’s new release would include guest performances by C-Money, OG, and Dela of Slightly Stoopid throughout the album. Jumping into the mix as well would be long time friend G. Love on the ballad “Wells”.
The Expendables have continued their tenacious touring schedule in 2011 with their popular annual Winter Blackout Tour. This summer, the band will be featured on all dates of the massive yearly festival favorite, Warped Tour.
Thirteen years later, five albums down and countless miles covered, The Expendables show no signs of slowing down.

Chronixx was the 'stage' name his friends bestowed on him, replacing the name 'Little Chronicle' he was given as the 'junior' to his father, the artist Chronicle. A little star amongst his peers, he had shown a love for music and song writing from an early age. He was born October 10, 1992 and was named Jamar Rolando McNaughton. His father, a musician, recognised his talents and nurtured him in an environment in which he could grow into whatever area of music he chose. Always accompanying him to the studio, Jamar grew up around the likes of Burro Banton, Norris Man and the legendary Gregory Isaacs. With a big smile and an engaging personality, he confidently set out to make his mark in music, by writing his first song 'Rice Grain' by the age of five and going on to be choir director and worship leader at 11. Coached by Danny Browne, he recorded his first song with him in 2003. Always displaying his versatility, Jamar, as a young man at St. Catherine High School, harmonized for gospel artistes such as Jermaine Edwards and reggae artiste Lutan Fyah.
At 14 years, he started producing and 'building riddims' for artistes such as Konshens and Munga Honorable and composing riddims such as the 'Freezer Riddim' for Icebox Records and voicing artistes such as, Popcaan for Maverick Records. While focusing on academics, with a special love for Visual Arts, Chronixx knew that his inner voice was coaxing him to let his own voice be heard. After his brother's death in 2009, Chronixx became more inspired to 'push out' and as fate would have it, in that same year, met some 'brothers' who have undoubtedly impacted on the promising artist he is today. The synergy he found with Romaine 'Teflon' Arnett of ZincFence Recordz gave birth to the creation of a singer, stepping out militantly with a unique voice and armed with lyrics and an accompanying musical sound, set to capture his place on the reggae music stage.
In 2010, as if on a mission, Alty 'J.O.E' Nunes impacted on the lives of not only his brothers, Aijah & Jahnoi, but on Chronixx as well. They started working as a team and after Joe's passing in February 2011, Chronixx, in honour of the Jah Ova Evil legacy, took his career to another level. Instead of going on to Edna Manley College as planned, he, along with other members of the Jah Ova Evil family, released singles such as Behind Curtain, African Heritage, Wall Street and Warrior.
Today, Chronixx credits his versatility and his professional stage presence to the early lessons he received from his father Chronicle, who always shared his own experiences and encouraged his son to go one step beyond with each performance. Chronixx is not disappointing his father, his family or his friends who know that the 'sky is the limit' for this young man who sees 'music as his mission.'

Collie Buddz

Light It Up, the new record from artist Collie Buddz, is momentous, gigantic and booming! It's immediately undeniable an awe-struck song complete with an unforgettable sing-along hook, the kind of beats that pound in the chest and a vocal performance that's as uncommon as it is infectious.

A hit record is probably the only thing that makes Salaam Remi pause his day. Remi, most known as one of the top-selling music producers in the world [Fugees, Usher, Fergie, and Amy Winehouse] and Executive Vice-President at Sony Music knows an irrefutable song when he hears it. After discovering Light It Up, Remi made an offer to Collie Buddz to join his label imprint Louder Than Life, a division of Sony Music Entertainment.

"Salaam knows music. It feels good. I want to reach a certain level with my career and go places I haven't gone yet. Being with Sony Music definitely helps with that," Buddz says with some anticipation.

Light It Up, is a new anthem spreading across every college campus and radio stations, but the artist that created the tune has a name that may sound familiar to some music fans. Buddz exploded onto the scene a few years ago when critics and tastemakers alike embraced him - Spin Magazine proclaiming, "Buddz proves the pop rule: Catchiness transcends color." From Vibe Magazine to Entertainment Weekly, Collie Buddz made quite an impression with music critics.

Produced by Neenyo, a protégé of hit maker J.R. Rotem, Light It Up easily goes from the car to nightclubs all over the world. Collie details his process, "As an artist, I want to expand musically. I'll always do Reggae. I did Reggae music because I was good at it and that's what I knew and loved growing up. But at the same time, when I put on my producer hat and I hear a riddim, it might not be in my comfort range, but whatever I hear on the track dictates what I'm going to make. I really only care about making good music. For that to happen, it can't live in a box."

Indeed growing up on the island of Bermuda, Reggae music was a formidable influence on a young Collie Buddz. Born Colin Harper in New Orleans, LA to a mother of Bermudian heritage with roots on the island dating back to the 1700s, his father passed away while Collie Buddz was at the tender age of four. At that time, his mother moved the family back home to Bermuda. It wasn't long before Buddz discovered more than his Bermudian heritage. Introduced to Reggae music by his older brother, Matthew, affectionately just known as "Smokey," by the tenderfoot age of 12, Colin Harper quickly learned his way around a music studio. It soon became apparent to everyone within earshot of the boy that his voice was unique in a way that lingers long after you've heard him. "Back then, I just used to plug headphones into the microphone jack of a tape deck. I'd sing into one of the earpieces and record it on cassette," Buddz recalls.

Eventually, Smokey relocated to Toronto to pursue an audio engineering degree. His baby brother, as always, tagged along. But Buddz had plans of his own. And, by the age of 19, he was attending Full Sail Academy in Orlando, FL pursuing his own audio engineering degree. Only 13 months later, Buddz had that degree. With dreams of becoming a major music producer, Buddz rejoined his brother in Canada.

As a producer, Buddz was the most comfortable in the studio. But he couldn't find any artists that could really pull off the sound he desired so Buddz far too often found himself just running back and forth from the vocal booth to the mixing booth as he layered his own vocals for his production work. After a while, it just became easier for him to just do it all by himself. At this juncture, Colin Harper became Collie Buddz.

With his independent spirit guiding his journey, Buddz has traveled as far possible from his little corner of the earth. He's constantly creating new music and experimenting with it in front of live audiences almost immediately. With support from his team at Mojiza Management and touring and merchandising backing at Ineffable Music, Collie Buddz has toured the world. He's honed his craft while in support of several tours with artists such as Cypress Hill, Rebelution and Matisyahu. He's performed in front of thousands at the largest music festivals such as Lollapalooza, Boomtown, Summer Jam and the California Roots Festival. While touring, Buddz still found time to record new material and release original music independently on his own record label, Harper Digital. He's even managed to launch a new radio station back home in Bermuda (Vibe 103) and become a father.

Armed with a tremendous record, it doesn't appear that Collie Buddz will soon be finding time to rest.

Common Kings

Common Kings produce phenomenal pop hits with rock, reggae, R&B and classic soul influences. Lead singer JR King (Hawaii/Samoa), guitarist Taumata Grey (Samoa), bassist Ivan Kirimaua (Fiji/Kiribati), drummer Jerome Taito (Tonga) and keyboardist Erik Pryztulski (Korea/Poland) grew up in dynamic households filled with vibrant passion for music. The Kings individual musical journeys were inspired by artists like Van Morrison, Stevie Wonder, George Benson, Jim Croce, Michael Jackson, The Who, Led Zeppelin, Gypsy Kings, Earth Wind & Fire and many traditional artists from the islands. The band's resulting original sound is a collection of these varied musical and cultural inspirations orchestrated into an array of head-rocking beats, feel-good rhythms, and emotional fervor. Their fun-loving attitude and "good vibes" high energy projects loud and clear during Common Kings' live performance experience. With lead-singer Sasualei "JR King" Maliga in the forefront, Common Kings possesses one of the most naturally gifted and powerfully impressive singers in the game today. Graced with a distinctive, raw, organic talent, JR's vocal ability appears boundless as he amazes listeners with his welcoming tone, wide range of rich notes, infectious melodies, and soulful passion. In the studio daily recording their first Common Kings EP, writing like mad with incredible producers and shooting hot new videos, their "formative years" as princes have come to a close and the Common Kings are stepping into their royal rule. You want to follow these leaders.

J Boog is a man of many influences. The singer of Samoan descent was born in Long Beach and raised in Compton, California. Growing up in the rough streets of Compton, the strong sense of tradition and culture that J Boog absorbed from his family was instrumental in his path to stay off the streets and begin a successful music career.

At the age of four, after hearing his older sister playing the
piano, he developed an interest and started watching her and learning about music. Soon, J was singing along to the notes & melodies he heard his sister play. A while later, she brought home a Bob Marley song book. Even at this young age, J knew Bob's name and his music. Upon hearing his sister begin to play, something clicked inside J. He hasn't been the same since.

The first time J Boog performed in front of an audience, he was nine years old. It was a large family reunion at a church and there were about 200 people present. J's mother and sister insisted for him to sing Whitney Houston's "One Moment In Time" and J obliged them. Though he was nervous, it went quite well.

J Boog's music career became serious in 2005, when a couple of brothers from his neighborhood brought him to one of J's favorite artists, George "Fiji" Veikoso". The two began working together immediately and J ended up moving to Hawaii in 2006 to continue developing his craft. After releasing his debut album "Hear Me Roar" in 2007, he joined the musical family Wash House Music Inc, a record label based in Hawaii and San Francisco.

A year later, in 2008, J Boog met Gramps Morgan of Morgan Heritage and there was an instant chemistry. Gramps was keen on working with J, and set out to make a way. Shortly after, Gramps, J Boog and other Wash House family members were in Jamaica recording in such prestigious places as Bob Marley's "Tuff Gong" Studio, Don Corleone's "Hit Maker", Bobby Digital's "Digital B", Shaggy's "Big Yard", Sugar Minott's "Youth Man Promotion" and more.

The results are apparent when listening to Boog's new music. It is authentic Island Music and genuine Jamaican reggae at the same time. Truly a new and exciting combination. There is a natural theme to Boog's writing: love. It recurs throughout his work and never once seems contrived. When you listen, you will feel he truly knows matters of the heart.

These days Boog is either in a studio, on a stage or catching a flight. Radio interviews have become a daily thing and it's a little overwhelming for the young artist, though he has been smart enough to keep his humility. He has a great sense of humor and an even better sense of reality. He can be overheard saying how blessed he is on a daily basis. It's easy to see why J Boog has been winning over fans when you meet him. He has the right spirit and attitude to carry him to the next level.

His new album, "Backyard Boogie" is slated for release September 27th 2011 and features Tarrus Riley, Jacob Hemphill (of SOJA), Peetah Morgan (of Morgan Heritage), Fiji and others.

Leading up to the release of his official new album, J Boog released the "J Boog EP" on June 14th 2011 via Wash House Hawaii/EMPIRE Distribution. The EP featured five brand new songs, along with three previously released songs, including his smash hits "Let's Do It Again" and "So Far Gone".

John Brown's Body

Together for two decades and hailed asng of vocals, percussion, keyboard, bass, guitar, and stunning 3-piece horn secti building "a legacy that has inspired and carved a path for the now thriving contemporary American reggae scene" (Rudeboy Reggae). Formed in Ithaca, New York, in the mid 1990s, at a time when there wasn't yet a far-reaching U.S. reggae scene, JBB was one of a small handful of U.S. reggae bands that began touring nationally. Since then, JBB has played an important role in helping define distinctly "American reggae." JBB's music is steeped in traditional vibes, but unapologetically incorporates elements from other genres. While most American reggae bands tackled typical reggae themes (such as religion and marijuana), JBB acted more like an indie band, writing songs that used the vocabulary of reggae to express their own experiences. Their unique approach resonated with the masses. The group's 2008 full-length record, Amplify, hit #1 on the Billboard Reggae Chart, 2012's JBB In Dub EP reached #1 on iTunes' Reggae Chart, and in 2013 Kings And Queens topped both Billboard and iTunes Reggae Charts at #1. Today, JBB's signature style has become the norm for U.S. reggae bands - and many in the genre admittedly point to John Brown's Body as a key influence.

“It’s all in our minds / Planted over time / Grew into a vine / That became intertwined” – from “All In Our Minds”

This lyric is the source of the title to Passafire’s fifth studio album, Vines. Though it wasn’t written with this intention, it was in retrospect that the band members – singer/guitarist Ted Bowne, drummer Nick Kubley, bassist/vocalist Will Kubley and keyboardist Mike DeGuzman – realized that it aptly described the current state of the band. Vines is a record that finds its makers at a creative peak, thanks in large part to the comfort of the current line-up, which has been solidified for a few years. They have grown up together, and over the years, as their individual stylistic preferences have changed, they’ve intertwined until the music becomes stronger like vines growing around each other. These four have become a super tight unit, which has led to a comfort level on stage and in the studio that Passafire has never achieved before.

Formed in 2003 in Savannah, GA, by Bowne and Nick Kubley, Passafire has built its strong reputation within the U.S. reggae scene through constant touring, along with a series of self-assured, largely self-produced records. In 2006, Will Kubley joined, replacing the band’s second bassist. Trained as a guitarist, Will switched to bass, bringing a fresh approach to the band’s reggae/rock hybrid, with equal parts one drop, frenetic slap bass and plenty of electronic treatments to come up with unique sounds. Of course, it helps the rhythm section rank among the tightest in the scene to have two brothers who grew up sharing a room now sharing the duties of drum & bass. DeGuzman came on board right before the recording of the band’s last release, 2011’s Start From Scratch, after catching the eye of the group while playing with The Expendables during their Winter Blackout Tour in 2010. He sat in for one tour then quickly became a key member of the quartet. While he played on Start From Scratch, much of the music was already written before he came on board to record it, so he feels like this record is the first to have his full involvement in the writing, arranging and developing of the songs.

Bowne and Nick Kubley attribute the band’s incessant touring schedule as a product of coming from Savannah. “While there is a music scene in Savannah with a number of good bands, it just doesn’t get the same support as other cities because of age restrictions at the shows,” Nick says. Bowne says, “Once we could hit the road, we started doing that, because it was just easier to build a following and learn the live performance ropes in other towns.”

While the roots of the band lie in Savannah, the group has split to live in different corners of the country; DeGuzman lives in Chicago, where he is from, while Will Kubley has moved to California. They overcome the distance by spending more than half of every year on the road together. (Touring life, along with the band’s drive to succeed, is captured neatly on the song “Go”: “Workin' hard every night for the right to be the kind of thing that everybody likes to see.”) It may seem strange to speak about a tight unit that lives this far apart, but that is just one of the many contradictions that seem to fire up this band rather than drag them down.

For example, a band that tours this much would normally be expected to road test songs and then hit the studio once they have an album’s worth of material. Passafire instead carves out time at home in songwriting sessions to work up completely new material for albums, which they later begin to work into the live setting. “We like to capture what we do live and show it in the songs,” DeGuzman explains. “The songs were written to show what we are capable of in the studio, while leaving room for further exploration in the live setting.”

Passafire has secured their place in the exploding U.S. reggae scene, yet musically they are often far apart from many of the bands in the community, with a growing emphasis on alternative rock and prog rock elements. Their lyrical content is often outside the norm as well, avoiding standard party themes, preferring to craft songs about love, the fight for good over evil, the relationship with man’s best friend, and, yes, even aliens in the propulsive “Souvenir.” And while at least half the band grew up enamored with long instrumental jams from bands like Umphrey’s McGee and Phish, it’s interesting to note the short, tightly structured songs on Vines, which eschew noodling and soloing for powerful yet understated efficiency.

The recording process for Vines was a bit different. Guitar and vocals were recorded at Bowne’s home studio over a three week period, after drums, keys and bass had been laid down at the legendary Sonic Ranch studio in El Paso, TX, where the band’s last two albums were recorded. “I was able to geek out at home,” says Bowne, “and try things that I might normally feel self-conscious about around other people. It was a very different experience from being on the clock in a room full of people listening to everything you play or sing.” Will Kubley benefitted especially from this process, as he sang lead on two songs (“Phony Imposter” and “Stowaway”). Bowne says, “I think his vocals sound more confident on these songs, which is a direct result of him being able to run his own session behind closed doors without any of the self-consciousness that exists when there are producers, engineers and other band members all secretly critiquing every single syllable of every lyric. Sure, we are performers and are used to performing in front of people, but making music is a private thing that, like art, is not finished until the artist himself approves of his own work.”

Once the recording was done, the band brought in Paul Leary (of the Butthole Surfers), who had produced their last record, as well as releases by scene mates Sublime, Pepper, and Slightly Stoopid, to do the final mixes. Former John Brown’s Body soundman Jocko Randall mastered the record, which was rather appropriate since all in the band credit JBB as one of the main groups that got them to form a band and work as hard as they have. It’s apropos after all these years, that Passafire is now on Easy Star Records, sharing the same label with their musical inspiration. In keeping with the DIY mode that dictates much of their work, Nick Kubley, who studied art in Savannah, drew the art for the album cover.

As for how their fans and peers will react to Vines as Passafire travels further into orbit away from the basic tropes and confines of the reggae scene? DeGuzman says, “This is our family, our friends, and our fan base, but I like to think they are growing with us.” Just a few more vines to intertwine and strengthen this complicated, beautiful foundation for Passafire.

The Movement

In April 2015, Columbia, South Carolina’s The Movement released their new single “Rescue” on Rootfire Records. The reggae-rock group will be recording a new full-length album this summer. Formed in 2004 by a trio of Sublime and Pixies fans, Joshua Swain, Jordan Miller, and John Ruff, aka DJ Riggles, launched The Movement with their "alternative reggae" debut album, ON YOUR FEET. In 2008, the group met Chris DiBeneditto, a Philadelphia-based producer who had worked with like-minded acts such as Slightly Stoopid and G. Love & Special Sauce. Relocating to Philadelphia, they recorded SET SAIL at DiBeneditto’s Philadelphonic Studios. The album has sold over 10,000 copies to date. The Movement expanded with the addition of Jason "Smiles" Schmidt on bass and Gary Jackson on drums. In 2012, Miller left the group, and the trio, now fronted by Swain, released their fourth album SIDE BY SIDE, debuting at #2 on the Billboard Reggae Chart. In 2014 The Movement released BENEATH THE PALMS, a surprise acoustic album as a free gift to their fans.

The Expanders

For more than a decade, U.S. reggae artists have been building a foundation from the Hawaiian islands to the east coast. This new generation of reggae artists continues to reach new heights of success with album and ticket sales, as well as winning over fans worldwide. While most modern American reggae bands are rooted in the rock reggae style, there are a few U.S. artists championing the lineage of classic roots reggae traditions, and Los Angeles-based vintage reggae revivalists The Expanders are leading that charge, building their sound around classic 70's and early 80's style reggae, with three-part vocal harmonies, conscious songwriting, and an indie-DIY spirit.

The five-piece band comprised of John Asher (Drums, Vocals), John Butcher (Guitar, Vocals), Roy Fishell (Organs), Chiquis Lozoya (Bass, Vocals), and Devin Morrison (Guitar, Vocals) have been making reggae fans and critics take note with their refreshing sound that references the "golden era" of reggae. Morrison and Butcher grew up listening to the record collection of famed reggae archivist Roger Steffens, and credit much of their love and knowledge to the accessibility and education of those experiences. Becoming friends with Steffens' son, they developed an obsession with exploring the deepest reaches of the genre.
The Expanders' new album Hustling Culture was released June 16, 2015, on indie tastemaker label Easy Star Records. Hustling Culture is the band's third studio album, but for the band members feels like their first proper album as a cohesive unit. Asher explains, "Our first album was a collection of music from good friends making a record together. Our second album was a great covers album, but Hustling Culture is the band coming into its own with our songwriting and musicianship." Morrison adds, "For this album we spent more time prepping and rehearsing, giving us more confidence in the recording studio. The result made the process more fun and enjoyable as we approached the song-writing in a more organized way and explored a wider range of topics than on the first album. Our combined efforts really shine through and all the musicians really stepped up and gave an inspired effort on the whole record." In addition to the core members, their extended family includes keyboardist Roger Rivas of The Aggrolites and Rivas Recordings. Rivas has been an integral part of The Expanders' recordings and helped maintain and produce the authentic sounds, which shine through on all the band's releases.

Hustling Culture was recorded entirely on analogue tape at Killion Sound in North Hollywood, CA, from 2012-2014. The studio is a favorite recording place for the band because it's run by Sergio Rios (Orgone), a friend who understands their unique aesthetic and has the gear to capture it, giving the album a warm and colorful palette.

The album title, Hustling Culture, comes from the album's opening line: "One dollar gone but the next soon come, we never stop from hustling culture." Morrison explains, "Everyone has a hustle, and ours is roots & culture music. It's a way of reminding ourselves that outside of just entertaining and financial gain, there is a bigger picture and larger purpose for writing about the topics and playing the style of roots reggae that we do." The Expanders' music is a reminder that reggae music wasn't born in a tropical beach paradise, but in the impoverished and underprivileged areas of Jamaica, resulting in a passionate expression for human rights, social justice and freedom from oppression.

There is a subtle, yet powerful conscious thread woven throughout Hustling Culture. "Uptown Set," for example, is about the hidden effects of our country's party lifestyle, which brings suffering and misery to innocent poor people caught along the routes where party drugs come across the border. "Thanks For Life" is a dedication to women, the struggle they face every day, and the debt of life that we all owe to them. "Top Shelf" is a tribute to the ganja farmers and the reflection of the changing cultural views on marijuana.

The band is part of a burgeoning Los Angeles reggae scene that sprang in large part from The Blue Beat Lounge (the longest running weekly ska night that happened at the Knitting Factory) and LA's longtime premier weekly reggae night Dub Club held at the Echoplex. A song that was inspired by a key member of that scene is "Reggae Pops," an infectious instrumental tune laid over a "steppers riddim" featuring John Butcher on lead guitar and Dan Hastie from Orgone on clavinet. The title was chosen as a tribute to the late-great Reggae Pops (born Nemencio Jose Andujar) who was a pillar of the Southern California reggae community for decades. Morrison states, "It's impossible to accurately describe what he meant to reggae music in Los Angeles, but those who remember him from shows will never forget him. He was a dancer, a fan, and a presence that was always felt. He was the man!"

The Expanders are on tour now supporting the release. Morrison concludes, "Our goal is to bring that vintage reggae feel and sound that we love to places where people might not get to hear it on a regular basis."

Sammy J

Sammy J currently resides in Auckland. His mother is Australian and his father is Maori hailing form Ngati Raukawa, Waikato. Born and bred in Aussie he describes himself as a 'Mozzie' but proud and confident in his identity and embraces his maori and Polynesian heritage and roots which influenced his perspective on life.

Revolutionary music may seem hard to come by in these days and times. Long gone is the era of artists like Bob Marley, The Clash, Stevie Wonder and Patti Smith getting airplay and bringing their messages to the masses. But that doesn't mean that the revolution isn't still brewing in the hearts and minds of many people around the globe.



Meet Mike Love. One of reggae music's rising stars. Born and raised in Oahu, Hawaii to a musical family that spans generations, Mike Love brings a multitude of influences to the table, all tied together by the common goal of making the world a better place.



Which is no mean feat. On his debut album, The Change I'm Seeking, Love harkens the legends of roots reggae in both his lyrics and his sound, but never relies on any one genre to hold him down. Coming from a wealth of influences – he started out playing classical piano as a teenager and later would perform in high school bands that were more akin to the grunge sounds of Soundgarden and Pearl Jam – Mike Love fuses the simple rhythms of classic reggae with the complex changes of the classical and rock music he was first trained on to come up with a style wholly unique to him. Mike is currently wrapping up his second album titled Love Will Find A Way.



But it's his message, his passion, the wisdom behind his words that truly resonate with his fans. "It's always been about the depth," Mike Love explains, "I've never been into music that was shallow. I'm still learning. I'm still learning about where I'm going and where I want to be. All the music is a learning tool to me too. I just make myself open to it. All the messages that come through the music, it's not just coming through me and my wisdom, because I don't think I'm that wise of a person. I don't think I'm some wise elder or anything like that. I just make myself open to the music and it just comes through. To me it's just as much of a teaching for me as it is for anyone who is listening to it and is open to it."



His songs take you on a journey, one of healing and inspiration. One designed to help you on your path to knowledge, wisdom and understanding. On "Permanent Holiday" he takes you on a lyrical quest for freedom, both his and yours. He laments the ills of the world but also discusses solutions and ideas to change them.



Mike Love has shared the stage with artists like Stephen Marley, Don Carlos, Trevor Hall, Nahko & Medicine For The People, John Butler Trio, Groundation, Steel Pulse, Dave Matthews and Jack Johnson.

Revolutionary, Conscious, Music.

Young, talented and ambitious define HIRIE as an individual and as an artist. Stirring up island-inspired vibes with sounds of roots, reggae and pop while also applying her smooth, sweet and naturally pop-sounding voice to blend it all together. HIRIE will undoubtedly be a driving force in new-age music.

Wheeland Brothers

The Wheeland Brothers are surfers making music for surfers. It's the Newport Beach shortboarder/Sublime attitude colliding with with the San-O chill-out longboarder/Jack Johnson vibe. We describe our music as acoustic beach rock and ukulele hip hop reggae. Our songs cover a full spread of punk reggae, acoustic hip hop, and ukulele bonfire jams, and hit all sides of the Southern Californian beach culture flavor.

Lindsay Perry (Billabong)

Combining her love of art, music and surfing, Lindsay has made a life that represents the very creativity she exudes. From Satellite Beach, FL, this young and vibrant being continues to turn heads with everything she pours herself into. When she¹s not surfing, writing, modeling or creating for Billabong, Spy, Nixon, Lost and Taylor Guitars, she¹s usually building upon her biggest accomplishment to date, writing and recording her own original music with an album well under way. And to add to what is already an impressive resume, Lindsay has designed and... READ MORE
Combining her love of art, music and surfing, Lindsay has made a life that represents the very creativity she exudes. From Satellite Beach, FL, this young and vibrant being continues to turn heads with everything she pours herself into. When she¹s not surfing, writing, modeling or creating for Billabong, Spy, Nixon, Lost and Taylor Guitars, she¹s usually building upon her biggest accomplishment to date, writing and recording her own original music with an album well under way. And to add to what is already an impressive resume, Lindsay has designed and launched a beautiful creative outlet, her website, lindsea.com, to catalog her impressions of what life tosses her way.

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